Toby Haynes

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Toby Haynes is a British television director, notable for his work on Doctor Who (2010–11), Sherlock (2012), Black Mirror (2017—2023), and Andor (2022). He also directed the Channel 4/HBO television film Brexit: The Uncivil War . [1]

Contents

He is a graduate of the National Film and Television School, and an alumnus of Falmouth University. [2]

He won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form) for the Doctor Who's episodes "The Pandorica Opens" and "The Big Bang" (2010). [3]

Filmography

Television

TitleEpisodesBroadcaster
Coming Up
  • "The Baader Meinhoff Gang Show" (2004)
Channel 4
Hollyoaks
  • 1 episode (2007)
Channel 4
M.I. High
  • "The Sinister Prime Minister" (2007)
  • "Stars in Their Eyes" (2007)
  • "The Big Freeze" (2007)
  • "The Power Thief" (2007)
  • "Nerd Alert" (2007)
  • "It's a Kind of Magic" (2008)
  • "You Can Call Me Al" (2008)
  • "Evil by Design" (2008)
  • "Fit Up" (2008)
  • "Face Off" (2008)
CBBC
Holby Blue
  • Series 2, Episode 3 (2008)
  • Series 2, Episode 4 (2008)
BBC One
Spooks: Code 9
  • Series 1, Episode 5 (2008)
  • Series 1, Episode 6 (2008)
BBC Three
Being Human
  • Series 1, Episode 1 (2009)
  • Series 1, Episode 2 (2009)
BBC Three
Five Days
  • "Day 1" (2010)
  • "Day 2" (2010)
  • "Day 8" (2010)
BBC One
Doctor Who BBC One
Sherlock BBC One
Wallander
  • "An Event in Autumn" (2012) [6]
BBC One
The Musketeers
  • "Friends and Enemies" (2014)
  • "Sleight of Hand" (2014)
BBC One
Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell BBC One
Black Mirror Netflix
Utopia
  • "Life Begins" (2020)
  • "Just a Fanboy" (2020)
  • "Tuesday's Child" (2020)
  • "Stay Alive, Jessica Hyde" (2020)
Amazon Prime
Andor
  • Series 1, Episodes 1–3 (2022)
  • Series 1, Episodes 8–10 (2022)
Disney+

Film

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References

  1. Greene, Steve (14 December 2018). "'Brexit' Trailer: Bald Benedict Cumberbatch Wants the UK to Leave the EU". IndieWire. Retrieved 21 December 2018.
  2. PixelRain (6 June 2012). "Five Top Tips: Toby Haynes" via Vimeo.
  3. "2011 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. 25 April 2011. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 9 April 2012.
  4. "Video: Doctor Who at Wondercon 2011 (View from 36:35)". YouTube. Retrieved 20 April 2011. So what's next for you?" "I'm doing Sherlock.
  5. "Sherlock returns in May". Twitter.com. 31 July 2011. Retrieved 28 September 2011.
  6. "Series 3 - LEFT BANK Pictures". Archived from the original on 18 August 2012. Retrieved 1 September 2012.