Tocancipá

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Tocancipá
Municipality and town
Torre de la campana en iglesia principal.JPG
Church tower of Tocancipá
Flag of Tocancipa (Cundinamarca).svg
Escudo del Municipio de Tocancipa.svg
Etymology: Muysccubun:
"Valley of the joys of the zipa "
Colombia - Cundinamarca - Tocancipa.svg
Location of the municipality and town inside Cundinamarca Department of Colombia
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Tocancipá
Location in Colombia
Coordinates: 4°57′56.7″N73°54′48.9″W / 4.965750°N 73.913583°W / 4.965750; -73.913583
CountryFlag of Colombia.svg  Colombia
Department Flag of Cundinamarca.svg Cundinamarca
Province Central Savanna Province
Founded21 September 1593
Founded by Miguel de Ibarra
Government
  MayorWalfrando Adolfo Forero Bejarano
(2016-2019)
Area
   Municipality and town73.24 km2 (28.28 sq mi)
  Urban
1.62 km2 (0.63 sq mi)
Elevation
2,605 m (8,547 ft)
Population
 (2018 census) [1]
   Municipality and town39,996
  Density550/km2 (1,400/sq mi)
   Urban
15,355
  Urban density9,500/km2 (25,000/sq mi)
Time zone UTC-5 (Colombia Standard Time)
Website Official website

Tocancipá (Spanish pronunciation:  [tokansiˈpa] ) is a municipality and town of Colombia in the Central Savanna Province, part of the department of Cundinamarca. Tocancipá is situated in the northern part of the Bogotá savanna, part of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense in the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes with the urban centre at an altitude of 2,605 metres (8,547 ft). The capital Bogotá, which metropolitan area includes Tocancipá, is 42 kilometres (26 mi) to the south. Tocancipá borders Gachancipá and Nemocón in the north, Zipaquirá in the west, Guasca and Guatavita in the east and Guasca and Sopó in the south. [2]

Contents

Etymology

The name Tocancipá comes from Muysccubun and means "Valley of the joys of the zipa". [2]

History

The area of Tocancipá was inhabited early in the history of inhabitation of the Altiplano. The archaeological site Tibitó is located within the boundaries of Tocancipá and evidence of inhabitation has been dated to 11,740 ± 110 years BP. [3] At the time of arrival of the Spanish conquistadores in 1537, Tocancipá was part of the Muisca Confederation, a loose confederation of different rulers of the Muisca. The zipa of Bacatá ruled over Tocancipá.

Modern Tocancipá was founded on September 21, 1593 by Miguel de Ibarra. [2]

Tourism

Jaime Duque Park, a family-oriented amusement park, is located in Tocancipá. The town also hosts the Autódromo de Tocancipá, a race track where vintage and GT races are held.

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Muisca</span> Ethnic group, Colombia

The Muisca are an indigenous people and culture of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense, Colombia, that formed the Muisca Confederation before the Spanish conquest. The people spoke Muysccubun, a language of the Chibchan language family, also called Muysca and Mosca. They were encountered by conquistadors dispatched by the Spanish Empire in 1537 at the time of the conquest. Subgroupings of the Muisca were mostly identified by their allegiances to three great rulers: the hoa, centered in Hunza, ruling a territory roughly covering modern southern and northeastern Boyacá and southern Santander; the psihipqua, centered in Muyquytá and encompassing most of modern Cundinamarca, the western Llanos; and the iraca, religious ruler of Suamox and modern northeastern Boyacá and southwestern Santander.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Zipaquirá</span> Municipality and city in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Zipaquirá is a municipality and city of Colombia in the department of Cundinamarca. Its neighboring municipalities are Cogua and Nemocón to the north; Tocancipá to the east; Tabio, Cajicá and Sopó to the south; and Subachoque and Pacho to the west. Its seat of municipal government is 49 kilometers from the national capital Bogotá. It is part of the Greater Bogotá Metropolitan Area, and is the capital of the Sabana Centro province. It is also the headquarters of the diocese of the same name and that includes much of the Department of Cundinamarca, extending to the centre of Bogotá, the region of Rionegro, the Ubaté Valley, and the region of Guavio.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Altiplano Cundiboyacense</span> Plateau in the Columbian Andes

The Altiplano Cundiboyacense is a high plateau located in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes covering parts of the departments of Cundinamarca and Boyacá. The altiplano corresponds to the ancient territory of the Muisca. The Altiplano Cundiboyacense comprises three distinctive flat regions; the Bogotá savanna, the valleys of Ubaté and Chiquinquirá, and the valleys of Duitama and Sogamoso. The average altitude of the altiplano is about 2,600 metres (8,500 ft) above sea level but ranges from roughly 2,500 metres (8,200 ft) to 4,000 metres (13,000 ft).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Guasca</span> Municipality and town in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Guasca is a Colombian town and municipality in the Guavio Province, part of the Cundinamarca Department located approximately 55 km from Bogotá passing through the town of La Calera, Cundinamarca or 65 km passing through Sopó. Guasca borders the municipalities Tocancipá and Guatavita in the north, Junín in the east, in the south La Calera and in the west Sopó.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Funza</span> Municipality and town in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Funza is a municipality and town of Colombia in the Western Savanna Province, of the department of Cundinamarca. Funza is situated on the Bogotá savanna, the southwestern part of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense with the urban centre at an altitude of 2,548 metres (8,360 ft). In Funza the La Florida wetland, part of the wetlands of Bogotá, a remnant of the Pleistocene Lake Humboldt, still exists. The town is part of the Metropolitan Area of Bogotá and borders Madrid and Tenjo in the north, Mosquera in the south, Madrid in the west and Cota and the locality Engativá of the capital Bogotá in the east. The eastern boundary is formed by the Bogotá River. Funza is the site of the former main settlement Bacatá of the Muisca Confederation. Modern Funza was founded by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada during the Spanish conquest of the Muisca on April 20, 1537.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gachancipá</span> Municipality and town in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Gachancipá is a municipality and town of Colombia in the Central Savanna Province, part of the department of Cundinamarca. The urban centre is located on the Altiplano Cundiboyacense at 42 kilometres (26 mi) from the capital Bogotá. The municipality borders Guatavita and Tocancipá in the south, Sesquilé and Guatavita in the east, Nemocón in the west and Suesca in the north.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Guatavita</span> Municipality and town in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Guatavita is a municipality and town of Colombia in the Guavio Province of the department of Cundinamarca. Guatavita is located 75 km northeast of the capital Bogotá. It borders Sesquilé and Machetá in the north, Gachetá and Junín in the east, Guasca in the south and in the west are Tocancipá and Gachancipá.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nemocón</span> Place in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Nemocón is a municipality and town of Colombia in the Central Savanna Province, part of the department of Cundinamarca. Nemocón, famous for its salt mine, was an important village in the Muisca Confederation, the country in the central Colombian Andes before the arrival of the Spanish. The municipality is situated in the northern part of the Bogotá savanna, part of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense with its urban centre at an altitude of 2,585 metres (8,481 ft) and 65 kilometres (40 mi) from the capital Bogotá. Nemocón is the northeasternmost municipality of the Metropolitan Area of Bogotá and the Bogotá River originates close to Nemocón. The median temperature of Nemocón is 12.8 °C. The municipality borders Tausa in the north, Suesca and Gachancipá in the east, Tocancipá and Zipaquirá in the south and in the west the rivers Checua and Neusa and the municipality of Cogua.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Suesca</span> Municipality and town in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Suesca is a town and municipality in the Almeidas Province, part of the department of Cundinamarca, Colombia. It is located on the Altiplano Cundiboyacense, 59 kilometres (37 mi) north of the capital Bogotá. Suesca forms the northern edge of the Bogotá savanna and is a scenic countryside town which is well known because its landscape attracts devotees of rock climbing, trekking, and rafting. It is surrounded by dairy farms and flower plantations. The municipality borders Cucunubá and Lenguazaque in the north, Sesquilé and Gachancipá in the south, Chocontá in the east and Nemocón in the west.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Zipacón</span> Municipality and town in Cundinamarca, Colombia

Zipacón is a municipality and town of Colombia in the Western Savanna Province, part of the department of Cundinamarca. The urban centre of Zipacón is situated at an altitude of 2,550 metres (8,370 ft) on the Bogotá savanna, the southern flatlands of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense in the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes. Zipacón borders Anolaima, Facatativá, La Mesa and Bojacá.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bogotá savanna</span> Motane savanna in Altiplano Cundiboyacense

The Bogotá savanna is a montane savanna, located in the southwestern part of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense in the center of Colombia. The Bogotá savanna has an extent of 4,251.6 square kilometres (1,641.6 sq mi) and an average altitude of 2,650 metres (8,690 ft). The savanna is situated in the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bacatá</span> Area on the Bogotá Savannah

Bacatá is the name given to the main settlement of the Muisca Confederation on the Bogotá savanna. It mostly refers to an area, rather than an individual village, although the name is also found in texts referring to the modern settlement of Funza, in the centre of the savanna. Bacatá, alternatively written as Muequetá or Muyquytá, was the main seat of the zipa, the ruler of the Bogotá savanna and adjacent areas. The name of the Colombian capital, Bogotá, is derived from Bacatá, but founded as Santafe de Bogotá in the western foothills of the Eastern Hills in a different location than the original settlement Bacatá, west of the Bogotá River, eventually named after Bacatá as well.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Techo, Bogotá</span> Barrio in Distrito Capital, Colombia

Techo is a neighbourhood (barrio) of Bogotá, Colombia, part of the locality Kennedy. It contains a wetland of the same name, part of the Wetlands of Bogotá, Colombia. The wetland covers about 11 hectares.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Muisca Confederation</span> Former Andean highlands confederation

The Muisca Confederation was a loose confederation of different Muisca rulers in the central Andean highlands of present-day Colombia before the Spanish conquest of northern South America. The area, presently called Altiplano Cundiboyacense, comprised the current departments of Boyacá, Cundinamarca and minor parts of Santander.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Muisca economy</span>

This article describes the economy of the Muisca. The Muisca were the original inhabitants of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense, the high plateau in the Eastern Ranges of central present-day Colombia. Their rich economy and advanced merchant abilities were widely known by the indigenous groups of the area and described by the Spanish conquistadores whose primary objective was the acquisition of the mineral resources of Tierra Firme; gold, emeralds, carbon, silver and copper.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Spanish conquest of the Muisca</span> Part of the Spanish conquest of Colombia

The Spanish conquest of the Muisca took place from 1537 to 1540. The Muisca were the inhabitants of the central Andean highlands of Colombia before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors. They were organised in a loose confederation of different rulers; the psihipqua of Muyquytá, with his headquarters in Funza, the hoa of Hunza, the iraca of the sacred City of the Sun Sugamuxi, the Tundama of Tundama, and several other independent caciques. The most important rulers at the time of the conquest were psihipqua Tisquesusa, hoa Eucaneme, iraca Sugamuxi and Tundama in the northernmost portion of their territories. The Muisca were organised in small communities of circular enclosures, with a central square where the bohío of the cacique was located. They were called "Salt People" because of their extraction of salt in various locations throughout their territories, mainly in Zipaquirá, Nemocón, and Tausa. For the main part self-sufficient in their well-organised economy, the Muisca traded with the European conquistadors valuable products as gold, tumbaga, and emeralds with their neighbouring indigenous groups. In the Tenza Valley, to the east of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense where the majority of the Muisca lived, they extracted emeralds in Chivor and Somondoco. The economy of the Muisca was rooted in their agriculture with main products maize, yuca, potatoes, and various other cultivations elaborated on elevated fields. Agriculture had started around 3000 BCE on the Altiplano, following the preceramic Herrera Period and a long epoch of hunter-gatherers since the late Pleistocene. The earliest archaeological evidence of inhabitation in Colombia, and one of the oldest in South America, has been found in El Abra, dating to around 12,500 years BP.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Muisca warfare</span>

This article describes the warfare of the Muisca. The Muisca inhabited the Tenza and Ubaque valleys and the Altiplano Cundiboyacense, the high plateau of the Colombian Eastern Ranges of the Andes in the time before the Spanish conquest. Their society was mainly egalitarian with little difference between the elite class (caciques) and the general people. The Muisca economy was based on agriculture and trading raw materials like cotton, coca, feathers, sea snails and gold with their neighbours. Called "Salt People", they extracted salt from brines in Zipaquirá, Nemocón and Tausa to use for their cuisine and as trading material.

The Cabildo Mayor del Pueblo Muisca is an organisation of indigenous people, in particular the Muisca. It was established in September 2002 in Bosa, Bogotá, Colombia. The organisation, member of National Indigenous Organization of Colombia (ONIC), focuses on defending the rights of the descendants of the Muisca, and the development of cultural and historical heritage, territory and health and the linguistics of the indigenous language, Muysccubun.

The Teusacá River is a river in the Eastern Hills of Bogotá and on the Bogotá savanna. It is a left tributary of the Bogotá River, Colombia. The river of 69 kilometres (43 mi) long originates at an elevation of 3,560 metres (11,680 ft) at the Alto Los Tunjos, Santa Fe, and flows northward through the municipalities La Calera, Guasca, Sopó, to flow into the Bogotá River in Cajicá at an elevation of 2,554 metres (8,379 ft). The upper part of the Teusacá River basin has a páramo ecosystem with the páramos of Chingaza, El Verjón and Cruz Verde surrounding the river. The San Rafael Reservoir in La Calera, important water source for the Colombian capital, is sourced by the Teusacá River.

References

  1. Citypopulation.de
  2. 1 2 3 (in Spanish) Official website Tocancipá
  3. Aceituno & Rojas, 2012, p.127

Bibliography