Tochiakagi Takanori

Last updated
Tochiakagi Takanori
栃赤城 雅男
Personal information
BornMasao Kanaya
(1954-10-31)October 31, 1954
Numata, Gunma, Japan
DiedAugust 18, 1997(1997-08-18) (aged 42)
Height1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Weight135 kg (298 lb)
Career
Stable Kasugano
Record556-543-46
DebutJanuary, 1973
Highest rankSekiwake (May, 1979)
RetiredMarch, 1990
Championships 1 (Jūryō)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (4)
Fighting Spirit (4)
Gold Stars 8
Kitanoumi (3)
Wakanohana II (3)
Mienoumi
Wajima
* Up to date as of Sep. 2012.

Tochiakagi Takanori (born Masao Kanaya; October 31, 1954 – August 18, 1997) was a sumo wrestler from Numata, Gunma, Japan. He made his professional debut in January 1973, and reached the top division in May 1977. His highest rank was sekiwake , which he first reached in May 1979. Unusually he kept the rank for the following tournament even though he had a majority of losses (7–8), because there were few wrestlers below him with good enough records to replace him. This was the first such occurrence since the establishment of the six tournaments per year system in 1958. He beat three yokozuna , Wajima, Wakanohana and Mienoumi, in one tournament in November 1979, and was to win eight kinboshi in total during his top division career. He won four Outstanding Performance and four Fighting Spirit prizes. He was one of the few wrestlers to employ the rare foot sweep technique of susoharai. In 1980 he was tipped alongside Kotokaze and Asashio as a possible ozeki candidate, [1] but never achieved his potential due to an apparent aversion to hard training, and a smoking habit. He missed the November 1980 tournament because of a leg injury and thereafter had chronic problems with both his ankles. In addition he had a poor diet and suffered from diabetes towards the end of his career. He fought in the unsalaried makushita division for 27 tournaments after being demoted from the jūryō division in 1985, longer than any other former sekiwake. He decided to retire when his stable master, former yokozuna Tochinishiki died in January 1990, although his name remained on the banzuke for the following tournament in the sandanme division, making him the first former sanyaku wrestler to fall this low since Ōyutaka in November 1985. He left the sumo world upon retirement. He died of a heart attack in 1997.

Contents

Career record

Tochiakagi Takanori [2]
Year January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1973(Maezumo)WestJonokuchi#11
61
 
WestJonidan#53
61
 
WestJonidan#5
52
 
WestSandanme#46
43
 
WestSandanme#30
34
 
1974EastSandanme#42
52
 
EastSandanme#21
43
 
WestSandanme#10
52
 
EastMakushita#49
43
 
WestMakushita#39
43
 
WestMakushita#32
43
 
1975WestMakushita#23
43
 
WestMakushita#20
25
 
WestMakushita#35
52
 
EastMakushita#19
43
 
WestMakushita#15
34
 
WestMakushita#22
34
 
1976WestMakushita#30
61
 
WestMakushita#12
43
 
EastMakushita#8
43
 
WestMakushita#4
52
 
WestMakushita#1
52
 
WestJūryō#10
87
 
1977EastJūryō#6
87
 
WestJūryō#3
96
 
WestMaegashira#12
105
F
EastMaegashira#4
510
 
WestMaegashira#9
87
 
WestMaegashira#6
96
 
1978WestMaegashira#2
411
 
WestMaegashira#8
78
 
EastMaegashira#11
87
 
EastMaegashira#8
87
 
EastMaegashira#5
78
 
WestMaegashira#6
87
 
1979WestMaegashira#1
69
 
EastMaegashira#4
105
F
EastSekiwake#1
78
 
WestSekiwake#1
96
O
EastSekiwake#1
69
 
WestMaegashira#1
105
O
1980WestSekiwake#1
114
O
EastSekiwake#1
69
 
WestMaegashira#2
Sat out due to injury
0015
WestMaegashira#2
105
F
WestSekiwake#1
159
 
EastMaegashira#8
Sat out due to injury
0015
1981EastMaegashira#8
96
 
EastMaegashira#2
105
O
EastKomusubi#1
510
 
EastMaegashira#4
510
 
WestMaegashira#7
87
WestMaegashira#5
96
F
1982EastMaegashira#1
213
EastMaegashira#7
69
 
WestMaegashira#10
69
 
EastMaegashira#15
69
 
EastJūryō#3
78
 
EastJūryō#5
78
 
1983WestJūryō#6
87
 
EastJūryō#5
96
 
EastJūryō#2
96
 
EastMaegashira#13
69
 
EastJūryō#4
87
 
EastJūryō#3
105
 
1984EastMaegashira#13
69
 
WestJūryō#1
87
 
EastJūryō#1
510
 
EastJūryō#7
96
 
WestJūryō#3
114
Champion

 
EastMaegashira#12
69
 
1985EastJūryō#2
510
 
WestJūryō#5
69
 
EastJūryō#11
69
 
WestMakushita#2
43
 
EastJūryō#13
114
 
WestMakushita#15
25
 
1986EastMakushita#32
34
 
EastMakushita#43
34
 
EastMakushita#58
43
 
WestMakushita#42
52
 
WestMakushita#21
34
 
EastMakushita#30
43
 
1987 EastMakushita#23
52
 
WestMakushita#13
52
 
WestMakushita#6
34
 
WestMakushita#11
43
 
EastMakushita#6
43
 
EastMakushita#3
34
 
1988 EastMakushita#8
34
 
EastMakushita#12
43
 
WestMakushita#7
43
 
EastMakushita#3
34
 
EastMakushita#8
34
 
EastMakushita#13
34
 
1989 WestMakushita#18
43
 
EastMakushita#14
43
 
WestMakushita#10
43
 
EastMakushita#8
43
 
EastMakushita#3
25
 
EastMakushita#16
16
 
1990 WestMakushita#39
25
 
EastSandanme#4
Retired
007
xxxx
Record given as wins–losses–absencies    Top division champion Top division runner-up Retired Lower divisions Non-participation

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

See also

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References

  1. Sharnoff, Lora (21 November 1980). "Lora's Look at Sumo" (PDF). Tokyo Weekender. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  2. "Tochiakagi Takanori Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-04.