Tochifuji Katsutake

Last updated
Tochifuji Katsutake
栃富士 勝健
Personal information
Born Haruo Kogure
(1946-06-08)June 8, 1946
Kumagaya, Saitama, Japan
Died April 28, 2003(2003-04-28) (aged 56)
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight 141 kg (311 lb; 22.2 st)
Career
Stable Kasugano
Record 461-434-18
Debut May, 1961
Highest rank Maegashira 3 (May, 1971)
Retired September, 1974
Championships 2 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
Gold Stars 2 (Kashiwado, Taihō)
* Up to date as of Sep. 2012.

Tochifuji Katsutake (born Haruo Kogure; June 8, 1946 – April 28, 2003) was a sumo wrestler from Kumagaya, Saitama, Japan. He made his professional debut in May 1961, and reached the top division in September 1968. Upon retirement from active competition he became an elder in the Japan Sumo Association under the name Yamawake. He coached at Kasugano-beya until 1990, when he joined Tamanoi-oyakata, who branched out to form Tamanoi-beya. He died on April 28, 2003, due to a myocardial infarction [1] [2]

Sumo full-contact wrestling sport

Sumo is a form of competitive full-contact wrestling where a rikishi (wrestler) attempts to force his opponent out of a circular ring (dohyō) or into touching the ground with any body part other than the soles of his feet.

Kumagaya, Saitama Special city in Kantō, Japan

Kumagaya is a city located in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 February 2016, the city had an estimated population of 198,440, and a population density of 1240 persons per km². Its total area is 159.82 square kilometres (61.71 sq mi).

Saitama Prefecture Prefecture of Japan

Saitama Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kantō region. The capital is the city of Saitama.

Contents

Career record

Tochifuji Katsutake [3]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1961xx(Maezumo)WestJonokuchi#24
52
 
EastJonidan#56
43
 
WestJonidan#9
25
 
1962WestJonidan#34
52
 
EastJonidan#2
34
 
EastJonidan#10
61
 
WestSandanme#50
43
 
WestSandanme#38
43
 
EastSandanme#27
43
 
1963EastSandanme#19
43
 
WestSandanme#8
43
 
WestMakushita#93
52
 
EastMakushita#64
25
 
WestMakushita#83
43
 
WestMakushita#73
61
 
1964EastMakushita#42
25
 
WestMakushita#55
43
 
EastMakushita#50
52
 
EastMakushita#35
52
 
EastMakushita#26
43
 
WestMakushita#21
61
 
1965EastMakushita#7
52
 
WestMakushita#2
35
 
WestMakushita#5
34
 
WestMakushita#9
61
 
WestMakushita#1
Sat out due to injury
007
WestMakushita#36
52
 
1966EastMakushita#27
43
 
WestMakushita#22
52
 
EastMakushita#14
61
 
WestMakushita#3
43
 
WestMakushita#1
25
 
EastMakushita#10
43
 
1967EastMakushita#7
61
 
EastMakushita#1
61
 
EastMakushita#3
70
Champion

 
EastJūryō#9
87
 
WestJūryō#6
87
 
EastJūryō#5
78
 
1968EastJūryō#6
69
 
EastJūryō#10
114
Champion

 
EastJūryō#3
87
 
WestJūryō#2
96
 
WestMaegashira#11
69
 
EastJūryō#2
96
 
1969WestMaegashira#12
114
 
EastMaegashira#5
69
WestMaegashira#6
411
 
EastMaegashira#12
510
 
WestJūryō#3
69
 
WestJūryō#6
78
 
1970EastJūryō#8
87
 
WestJūryō#5
510
 
WestJūryō#10
96
 
EastJūryō#5
96
 
WestJūryō#2
96
 
EastJūryō#2
105
 
1971EastMaegashira#11
87
 
WestMaegashira#7
87
 
EastMaegashira#3
213
EastMaegashira#11
510
 
WestJūryō#2
69
 
EastJūryō#5
510
 
1972WestJūryō#11
87
 
EastJūryō#6
69
 
WestJūryō#9
105
 
EastJūryō#3
78
 
EastJūryō#4
105P
Champion

 
EastMaegashira#13
510
 
1973EastJūryō#3
78
 
WestJūryō#5
87
 
EastJūryō#3
87
 
EastJūryō#2
69
 
EastJūryō#5
105
 
WestMaegashira#12
411
 
1974WestJūryō#5
87
 
WestJūryō#2
258
 
WestJūryō#11
96
 
WestJūryō#3
312
 
EastJūryō#13
Retired
1113
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

See also

Glossary of sumo terms Wikimedia list article

The following words are terms used in sumo wrestling in Japan.

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References

  1. "Tochifuji Katsutake Kabu History". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-15.
  2. "List of Changes". The Oyakata Gallery. Retrieved 2012-09-15.
  3. "Tochifuji Katsutake Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-15.