Tochinonada Taiichi

Last updated
Tochinonada Taiichi
栃乃洋 泰一
Tochinonada Taiichi20220115.jpg
Personal information
BornTaiichi Gotō
(1974-02-26) February 26, 1974 (age 49)
Ishikawa, Japan
Height1.87 m (6 ft 1+12 in)
Weight162 kg (357 lb; 25.5 st)
Career
Stable Kasugano
UniversityTakushoku University
Record669–700–31
DebutJanuary 1996
Highest rankSekiwake (March 2001)
RetiredJanuary, 2012
Elder name Takenawa
Championships 2 (Jūryō)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (3)
Fighting Spirit (2)
Technique (1)
Gold Stars 12
Akebono (3)
Wakanohana III (3)
Musashimaru (3)
Asashōryū (3)
* Up to date as of Jan 2012.

Tochinonada Taiichi (栃乃洋 泰一 born February 26, 1974, as Taiichi Gotō) is a former sumo wrestler from Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. An amateur sumo champion, he turned professional in 1996 and reached the top makuuchi division in 1997. He earned twelve kinboshi or gold stars for defeating yokozuna, the second highest ever, and he was a runner-up in two tournaments. His highest rank was sekiwake . He is now a coach at Kasugano stable under the name Takenawa Oyakata.

Contents

Career

Born in Nanao, he was a rival of fellow top division wrestler Dejima in elementary school. [1] He was an amateur sumo champion at Takushoku University, winning the College Yokozuna title. He joined Kasugano stable through a connection to Chigonoura Oyakata (the former sekiwake Masudayama), who was a fellow Takushoku University alumni and a coach at the stable, and made his professional debut in January 1996. Because of his amateur achievements he had makushita tsukedashi status, and so his debut tournament was in the third highest makushita division. He made the jūryō division in November 1996, switching from his family name of Gotō and adopting the shikona of Tochinonada. He was promoted to the top makuuchi division three tournaments later in May 1997.

Tochinonada had a strong start to his makuuchi career, earning special prizes for Fighting Spirit in consecutive tournaments in July and September 1997. He made his titled san'yaku debut that November at the rank of komusubi . However he could manage only six wins there and did not return to the san'yaku ranks until January 2001, when he made komusubi once again. He reached his highest rank of sekiwake in March 2001 and held it for two tournaments. He was runner-up in the January 2003 tournament, when he lost his first four matches but then rallied to win eleven in a row to finish three wins behind Asashōryū. He was also runner-up to Kaiō in September 2004, where he also scored 11–4.

In March 1999 he became the first wrestler ever to win by default two days in a row. [2] On Day 10 yokozuna Wakanohana withdrew, followed the next day by his brother Takanohana. However he did not receive a kinboshi for these victories. In May 1999 he injured ligaments in his left elbow in a match against Kaiō and had to sit out the following tournament in July. He did not miss any more bouts until six years later in July 2005 when he injured his right thigh on the second day and missed the rest of the tournament.

Tochinonada during the pre-bout warm up in May 2009. Sumo May09 Tochinonada.jpg
Tochinonada during the pre-bout warm up in May 2009.

During his long stay in the top division Tochinonada earned twelve kinboshi or gold stars for defeating yokozuna while ranked as a maegashira, which places him equal second on the all-time list, level with Takamiyama and behind only Akinoshima. His first kinboshi came in January 1998 when he defeated Akebono, and he earned his next three in three successive tournaments from May to September 1998. In November 2003 he defeated two yokozuna on two successive days, and was awarded the Outstanding Performance prize as well. He defeated all the yokozuna he met at least once, with the exception of Hakuhō (his victory over Takanohana was at sekiwake rank, meaning he was not eligible for a gold star on that occasion). His twelfth and final kinboshi came nearly four years after his previous one, in July 2008 against Asashōryū. Although Tochinonada touched the ground first, Asashōryū had already gone out of the ring, and was therefore shini-tai . [3] '

Tochinonada in September 2010 Tochinonada 2010 Sep.JPG
Tochinonada in September 2010

In November 2005 Tochinonada dropped to the juryo division, breaking a run of 52 consecutive tournaments in the top division since his entry in May 1997. However he immediately won the jūryō championship in January 2006 and was promoted straight back. He won his 500th career match in July 2007, producing a strong 10–5 score. He was promoted up the rankings to maegashira 2 in September 2007 and fought his first yokozuna bout since May 2005 when he met Hakuhō on the 4th day. He had a win over ōzeki Kotoōshū but finished the tournament with a 4–11 record. In March 2008 he recovered from losing his first six bouts to win eight in a row and achieve kachi-koshi. He was demoted to the jūryō division for the second time after the September 2009 tournament, and he moved back and forth between the top two divisions a number of times after that. In the January 2011 tournament, Tochinonada managed a 7–0 start after 7 days, his best ever, although he finished on 9–6. Following the retirement of Kaiō in the July 2011 tournament he became the active wrestler with the most wins in the top division (556), but could not avoid demotion to jūryō. In September he recorded his first ever make-koshi in the [jūryō division, scoring only 4–11.

Retirement

Following a performance with only three wins in the January 2012 tournament and facing certain demotion to the makushita division, he declared his retirement and missed his last match on the final day. He is remaining in the sumo world as a coach at his stable under the toshiyori or elder name Takenawa Oyakata. His official retirement ceremony or danpatsu-shiki took place at the Ryōgoku Kokugikan on 29 September 2012, with new yokozuna Harumafuji performing his dohyō-iri there for the first time.

Fighting style

Tochinonada was a yotsu-sumo wrestler, preferring grappling techniques that involve grabbing the opponent's mawashi . His favoured grip was hidari-yotsu (left hand inside, right hand outside), for which he was well known. [4] His most common winning kimarite was yorikiri (force out) but he also regularly used his preferred inside grip to win by shitatenage (underarm throw). He was also fond of oshidashi (push out) and tsukiotoshi (thrust down).

Career record

Tochinonada Taiichi [5]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1996 Makushita tsukedashi #60
61
 
WestMakushita#31
61
 
EastMakushita#13
43
 
WestMakushita#7
61PPP
 
WestMakushita#1
43
 
WestJūryō#13
132
Champion

 
1997 WestJūryō#4
105
 
EastJūryō#1
96
 
EastMaegashira#16
96
 
EastMaegashira#11
105
F
EastMaegashira#2
96
F
EastKomusubi#1
69
 
1998 WestMaegashira#2
78
EastMaegashira#3
96
 
EastMaegashira#1
78
WestMaegashira#2
510
EastMaegashira#6
78
WestMaegashira#6
69
 
1999 EastMaegashira#9
87
 
WestMaegashira#5
96
 
EastMaegashira#2
393
EastMaegashira#8
Sat out due to injury
0015
EastMaegashira#8
510
 
WestMaegashira#12
105
 
2000 EastMaegashira#4
69
EastMaegashira#6
96
 
EastMaegashira#1
510
 
EastMaegashira#3
78
 
WestMaegashira#3
411
 
WestMaegashira#7
105
 
2001 WestKomusubi#1
96
T
WestSekiwake#1
87
O
EastSekiwake#1
411
 
EastMaegashira#3
69
 
WestMaegashira#5
87
WestMaegashira#4
78
 
2002 EastMaegashira#6
87
 
EastMaegashira#3
87
 
WestKomusubi#1
78
 
EastMaegashira#1
78
WestMaegashira#1
411
 
EastMaegashira#6
69
 
2003 EastMaegashira#10
114
 
EastMaegashira#2
96
 
EastMaegashira#1
87
 
WestKomusubi#1
78
 
WestMaegashira#1
87
 
EastMaegashira#1
87
O
2004 EastKomusubi#1
69
 
EastMaegashira#3
87
 
EastMaegashira#1
510
 
WestMaegashira#6
96
 
WestMaegashira#3
114
O
WestKomusubi#1
69
 
2005 WestMaegashira#1
510
 
WestMaegashira#4
87
 
WestMaegashira#2
510
 
WestMaegashira#6
0213
 
EastMaegashira#17
78
 
WestMaegashira#17
78
 
2006 EastJūryō#1
132
Champion

 
WestMaegashira#12
87
 
WestMaegashira#9
69
 
EastMaegashira#12
105
 
EastMaegashira#5
78
 
WestMaegashira#5
78
 
2007 WestMaegashira#6
69
 
WestMaegashira#9
78
 
WestMaegashira#11
87
 
EastMaegashira#9
105
 
EastMaegashira#2
411
 
WestMaegashira#7
87
 
2008 WestMaegashira#3
510
 
WestMaegashira#8
87
 
EastMaegashira#8
96
 
WestMaegashira#3
78
WestMaegashira#4
69
 
WestMaegashira#7
510
 
2009 WestMaegashira#10
87
 
EastMaegashira#8
87
 
EastMaegashira#5
510
 
WestMaegashira#9
69
 
WestMaegashira#12
411
 
EastJūryō#2
87
 
2010 WestMaegashira#15
510
 
WestJūryō#2
105
 
EastMaegashira#14
312
 
EastJūryō#6
96
 
EastMaegashira#14
87
 
WestMaegashira#13
69
 
2011 WestMaegashira#16
96
 
WestMaegashira#14
Tournament Cancelled
000
WestMaegashira#14
69
 
WestMaegashira#14
69
 
EastJūryō#1
411
 
EastJūryō#9
87
 
2012 EastJūryō#8
Retired
312
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kyokutenhō Masaru</span> Sumo wrestler

Kyokutenhō Masaru in Nalaikh, Ulan Bator, Mongolia is a former professional sumo wrestler. He fought out of Ōshima stable, with the first group of Mongolians ever to join the sport in Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kaiō Hiroyuki</span> Sumo wrestler

Kaiō Hiroyuki is a former professional sumo wrestler from Nōgata, Fukuoka, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Miyabiyama Tetsushi</span>

Miyabiyama Tetsushi is a former sumo wrestler from Mito, Ibaraki, Japan. A former amateur champion, he turned professional in 1998. With the exception of two tournaments, he was ranked in the top division of professional sumo from 1999 until the end of his career in 2013, holding the second highest rank of ōzeki from 2000 to 2001. He won eight special prizes and was runner-up in four top division tournaments. He wrestled for Fujishima stable, where he worked as a coach until opening his own Futagoyama stable.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Toyonoshima Daiki</span>

Toyonoshima Daiki is a former professional sumo wrestler from Sukumo, Kōchi, Japan. He made his professional debut in January 2002, reaching the top makuuchi division in September 2004. He was a runner-up in five tournaments, and earned ten special prizes. His highest rank was sekiwake, which he first reached in September 2008 and held for five tournaments in total. Following a suspension in July 2010 he was demoted to the jūryō division, but upon his return to makuuchi in November 2010 he took part in a playoff for the championship. He won four kinboshi or gold stars awarded for yokozuna upsets, three of them earned by defeating Harumafuji from 2013 to 2015. He wrestled for Tokitsukaze stable. He retired in 2020 and was an elder of the Japan Sumo Association under the name of Izutsu-oyakata until his departure from the association in January 2023.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tamanoshima Arata</span>

Tamanoshima Arata is a former sumo wrestler from Izumizaki, Fukushima, Japan. A former amateur champion, he made his professional debut in 1998, reaching the top makuuchi division at the end of 2000. He was twice runner-up in a tournament, and earned six special prizes and two gold stars during his career. His highest rank was sekiwake. He wrestled for Kataonami stable. He retired in November 2011 to become an elder of the Japan Sumo Association and is now known as Hanaregoma Oyakata. In December 2021 he became head coach of Hanaregoma stable.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Akinoshima Katsumi</span>

Akinoshima Katsumi is a former sumo wrestler from Akitsu, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. He made his professional debut in 1982, and after reaching the top division in 1988 he remained there for 15 years. His highest rank was sekiwake. He was known as the "giant killer" having defeated more yokozuna than any other untitled wrestler (maegashira) in the history of sumo, earning himself 16 gold stars or kinboshi over his career, four more than his nearest kinboshi earning rivals, Takamiyama and Tochinonada. He also has received 19 performance prizes (sanshō), another record in sumo history.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2009.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2007.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2006.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2005.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2004.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2003.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2002.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2001.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2000.

The following were the events in professional sumo during 1997.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2010.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2011.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2012.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2018.

References

  1. Sumo Fan Magazine
  2. "Featured rikishi – Tochinonada". Sumo Forum. 19 February 2005. Retrieved 28 September 2010.
  3. "Mongolians Hakuho, Ama tied for lead at Nagoya sumo tournament". PR-Inside.com. 2008-07-17. Archived from the original on February 17, 2012. Retrieved 2008-07-19.
  4. Mattila, Mikko (June 2007). "Kimarite Focus" (PDF). Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 3 August 2009.
  5. "Rikishi in Juryo and Makunouchi". szumo.hu. Retrieved 2007-09-24.