Today and Tomorrow (1912 film)

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Today and Tomorrow
Directed by Mihály Kertész
Written by
Starring
CinematographyRaymond Pellerin
Release date
October 14, 1912
CountryHungary
LanguageSilent

Today and Tomorrow (Hungarian : Ma és holnap) is a 1912 film directed by Michael Curtiz, and starring Gyula Abonyi and Jenőné Veszprémy.

Contents

Plot summary

Cast


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