Toei Ōedo Line

Last updated
Toei Ōedo Line
Toei Oedo line symbol.svg
Toei-subway12-600.jpg
A Toei 12-600 series train on the Ōedo Line
Overview
Other name(s)E
Native name大江戸線
Owner Symbol of Tokyo Metropolis.svg Toei Subway
Line number12
Locale Tokyo
Termini
Stations38
Color on map Ruby (#b6007a)
Magenta (#8B008B)
Service
Type Rapid transit
System Tokyo subway
Operator(s)Toei Subway
Depot(s)Kiba
Rolling stock Toei 12-000 and Toei 12-600 series
Daily ridership933,621 (2016) [1]
History
Opened10 December 1991;32 years ago (1991-12-10) (First section)
12 December 2000;23 years ago (2000-12-12) (Entire line)
Technical
Line length40.7 km (25.3 mi)
Number of tracks Double-track
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in) standard gauge with linear induction motor between
Minimum radius 100 m (330 ft)
Electrification 1,500 V DC (overhead line)
Operating speed70 km/h (43 mph)
Signalling Cab signalling, Closed block
Train protection system New CS-ATC, ATO
Maximum incline 5.0%
Route map

Toei Oedo line.png

Contents

km
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0.0
Tochomae
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0.8
Shinjuku-nishiguchi
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Seibu Shinjuku Line
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2.2
Higashi-shinjuku
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F Fukutoshin Line
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3.2
Wakamatsu-kawada
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3.8
Ushigome-yanagicho
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4.8
Ushigome-kagurazaka
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N Namboku Line
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JR Chūō-Sōbu Line
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5.8
Iidabashi
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T Tozai Line
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Y Yūrakuchō Line
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JR Chūō-Sōbu Line
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N Namboku Line
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6.8
Kasuga
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I Mita Line
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N Namboku Line (at Korakuen )
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M Marunouchi Line (at Korakuen)
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7.6
Hongo-sanchome
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M Marunouchi Line
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8.7
Ueno-okachimachi
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G Ginza Line (at Ueno-hirokoji)
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H Hibiya Line (at Naka-okachimachi)
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JR Yamanote Line (at Okachimachi)
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JR Keihin-Tōhoku Line (at Okachimachi)
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Tsukuba Express
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9.5
Shin-okachimachi
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Tsukuba Express
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10.5
Kuramae
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A Asakusa Line
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11.7
Ryogoku
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JR Chūō-Sōbu Line
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12.7
Morishita
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Toei Shinjuku Line
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13.3
Kiyosumi-shirakawa
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Z Hanzōmon Line
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Kiba depot
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14.5
Monzen-nakacho
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T Tozai Line
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15.9
Tsukishima
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Y Yūrakuchō Line
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16.7
Kachidoki
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18.2
Tsukijishijo
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19.1
Shiodome
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Yurikamome Line
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JR Yamanote Line (at Hamamatsuchō)
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JR Keihin-Tōhoku Line (at Hamamatsuchō)
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Tokyo Monorail (at Hamamatsuchō)
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20.0
Daimon
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'A Asakusa Line
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21.3
Akabanebashi
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22.1
Azabu-juban
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N Namboku Line
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23.2
Roppongi
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H Hibiya Line
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24.5
Aoyama-itchome
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BSicon HUB.svg
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Z Hanzōmon Line
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BSicon HUBe.svg
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G Ginza Line
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JR Chūō-Sōbu Line (at Sendagaya)
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25.7
Kokuritsu-kyogijo
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JR Yamanote Line / JR Shōnan-Shinjuku Line
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27.2
Yoyogi
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JR Saikyō Line
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27.8
Shinjuku
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M Marunouchi Line
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S Shinjuku Line thoroughfare to Keio New Line
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Odakyu Odawara Line
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Seibu Shinjuku Line
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Keio Line
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JR Saikyo Line
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JR Yamanote Line
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JR Chūō-Sōbu Line
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28.6
Tochomae
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29.4
Nishi-shinjuku-gochome
BSicon HUBrg.svg
BSicon HUBeq.svg
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30.6
Nakano-sakaue
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Marunouchi Line
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Marunouchi Branch Line
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31.6
Higashi-nakano
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JR Chūō-Sōbu Line
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32.4
Nakai
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Seibu Shinjuku Line
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33.7
Ochiai-minami-nagasaki
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35.3
Shin-egota
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36.9
Nerima
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Seibu Ikebukuro Line
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37.8
Toshimaen
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39.3
Nerima-kasugacho
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40.7
Hikarigaoka

The Toei Ōedo Line (都営地下鉄大江戸線, Toei Chikatetsu Ōedo-sen) is a subway line in Tokyo, Japan, operated by the Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation (Toei). It commenced full operations on December 12, 2000; using the Japanese calendar this reads "12/12/12" as the year 2000 equals Heisei 12. The line is completely underground, making it the second-longest railway tunnel in Japan after the Seikan Tunnel.

On maps and signboards, the line is shown in magenta. Stations carry the letter "E" followed by a two-digit number inside a more pinkish ruby circle.

Overview

The Ōedo Line is the first Tokyo subway line to use linear motor propulsion (and the second in Japan after the Osaka Metro Nagahori Tsurumi-ryokuchi Line), which allows it to use smaller cars and smaller tunnels (a benefit similarly achieved by the Advanced Rapid Transit system manufactured by Bombardier). This technology, though, is incompatible with other railway and subway lines, which can only operate with vehicles utilizing conventional rotary motors, thus preventing Ōedo Line trains from operating through services onto them. Although vehicles with rotary motor propulsion can technically operate on the Ōedo Line, its smaller tunnels and loading gauge prevents such occurrences, hence making the Ōedo Line the first self-enclosed subway line in Tokyo in over 40 years, and the first and to date only such line operated by Toei, although there is a track connection to the Asakusa Line that can only be used by Class E5000 locomotives.

The line is deep (as low as 48 metres (157 ft) below ground at points) through central Tokyo, including three underground crossings of the Sumida River. Originally budgeted at ¥682.6 billion and 6 years, the construction ended up taking nearly 10 years and estimates of the final cost of construction range from the official ¥988.6 billion to over ¥1,400 billion yen, making it the most expensive subway line ever built at that point. [2] However, Singapore's Downtown MRT Line stages 1–3 completed in 2017 are 2.84 times as expensive, at 33,669.5 compared to 11,571.8 US dollars per kilometer after adjusting for inflation and international price differences. In per-kilometer terms New York's Second Avenue Subway Phase 1, also completed in 2017, is over 5.5 times costlier at 2,308.3 compared to 416.3 price-adjusted US dollars per kilometer. [3]

Ridership projections originally estimated 1 million users daily, a figure scaled down to 820,000 before opening. At the end of 2006, the line was averaging 720,000 passengers/day. [4] However, its ridership has increased by about five percent each year since its opening, following new commercial and residential development around major stations such as Roppongi and Shiodome. According to the Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation, as of June 2009 the Ōedo Line was the fourth most crowded subway line in Tokyo, at its peak running at 178% [a] capacity between Monzen-Nakachō and Tsukishima stations. [5]

There are plans to extend the Ōedo Line westward from its current western terminus at Hikarigaoka Station through to a new terminus in Ōizumigakuenchō, 1.5 km (0.93 mi) north of Ōizumi-gakuen Station (on the Seibu Ikebukuro Line) then later towards Higashi-Tokorozawa Station (on the Musashino Line). Construction of the first segment to Ōizumigakuenchō is tentatively scheduled for before 2015, and will include the construction of three new stations, temporarily named Doshida station, Ōizumichō station and Ōizumigakuenchō station. [6] Following the awarding of the 2020 Summer Olympics to Tokyo, there has been speculation regarding the addition of another 2.7 km (1.7 mi) to the proposed extension in order to extend the line to Niiza where the shooting range for the Olympics is to be located. A decision regarding this matter is expected in 2015. [7] [ needs update ]

Services

The Ōedo Line runs in a loop around central Tokyo before branching out towards Nerima in the western suburbs, meaning the line is shaped like a figure 6 lying on its side. It is not a true loop line: trains from the western Hikarigaoka terminus run anticlockwise around the loop and terminate at the intermediate Tochōmae Station facing towards Hikarigaoka, and vice versa. The arrangement is very much like the London Underground Circle Line since 2009, but does not share any track segments with other lines.

The full 40.7 km (25.3 mi) trip from Tochōmae around the loop and onward to Hikarigaoka takes 81 minutes. Trains operate once every three to five minutes during rush hours, and once every six minutes during off-peak weekday hours, weekends and holidays. [8]

Noise complaints

The Ōedo line is one of the noisiest train lines in the world, with decibel levels reaching 90 decibels frequently along the line. [9] However, during the COVID-19 outbreak, noise levels have reached to over 105 decibels. The train line's President states that infection is a more significant concern [than hearing damage], and therefore train's windows are kept open to increase ventilation, which caused a number of complaints. As of April 2023, windows continue to be kept open to reduce the risks of Covid-19 transmission. [10] The cause of the Ōedo line's high noise levels lies in construction constraints such as preexisting infrastructure and the need to build deep tunnels, resulting in low-radius curves and small tunnels. [11]

Station list

All stations are located in Tokyo.

No.StationJapaneseDistance (km)TransfersLocation
Between
stations
From E-28
E28 Tochomae 都庁前-0.0E Toei Oedo Line (for Hikarigaoka and Roppongi) Shinjuku
E01 Shinjuku-nishiguchi 新宿西口0.80.8
E02 Higashi-shinjuku 東新宿1.42.2F Fukutoshin Line (F-12)
E03 Wakamatsu-kawada 若松河田1.03.2 
E04 Ushigome-yanagicho 牛込柳町0.63.8 
E05 Ushigome-kagurazaka 牛込神楽坂1.04.8 
E06 Iidabashi 飯田橋1.05.8
Bunkyō
E07 Kasuga 春日1.06.8
E08 Hongō-sanchōme 本郷三丁目0.87.6M Marunouchi Line (M-21)
E09 Ueno-okachimachi 上野御徒町1.18.7 Taitō
E10 Shin-okachimachi 新御徒町0.89.5 Tsukuba Express mark.svg Tsukuba Express (02)
E11 Kuramae 蔵前1.010.5A Asakusa Line (A-17)
E12 Ryōgoku 両国1.211.7JB Chūō-Sōbu Line Sumida
E13 Morishita 森下1.012.7S Shinjuku Line (S-11) Kōtō
E14 Kiyosumi-shirakawa 清澄白河0.613.3Z Hanzōmon Line (Z-11)
E15 Monzen-nakacho 門前仲町1.214.5T Tozai Line (T-12)
E16 Tsukishima 月島1.415.9Y Yurakucho Line (Y-21) Chūō
E17 Kachidoki 勝どき0.816.7 
E18 Tsukijishijō 築地市場1.518.2 
E19 Shiodome 汐留0.919.1 Yurikamome line symbol.svg Yurikamome (U-02) Minato
E20 Daimon 大門0.920.0
E21 Akabanebashi 赤羽橋1.321.3 
E22 Azabu-juban 麻布十番0.822.1N Namboku Line (N-04)
E23 Roppongi 六本木1.123.2H Hibiya Line (H-04)
E24 Aoyama-itchōme 青山一丁目1.324.5
  • G Ginza Line (G-04)
  • Z Hanzomon Line (Z-03)
E25 Kokuritsu-Kyōgijō 国立競技場1.225.7JB Chūō-Sōbu Line (Sendagaya)Shinjuku
E26 Yoyogi 代々木1.527.2
  • JB Chūō-Sōbu Line
  • JY Yamanote Line
Shibuya
E27 Shinjuku 新宿0.627.8
  • S Toei Shinjuku Line (S-01)
  • JC Chūō Line (Rapid)
  • JB Chūō-Sōbu Line
  • JY Yamanote Line
  • JA Saikyō Line
  • JS Shōnan-Shinjuku Line
  • OH Odakyu Odawara Line
  • KO Keio Line
  • KO Keio New Line
E28 Tochomae 都庁前0.828.6E Toei Ōedo Line (for Iidabashi)Shinjuku
E29 Nishi-shinjuku-gochome 西新宿五丁目0.829.4 
E30 Nakano-sakaue 中野坂上1.230.6MMb Marunouchi Line (M-06) Nakano
E31 Higashi-Nakano 東中野1.031.6JB Chūō-Sōbu Line
E32 Nakai 中井0.832.4 SeibuShinjuku.svg Seibu Shinjuku LineShinjuku
E33 Ochiai-minami-nagasaki 落合南長崎1.333.7 
E34 Shin-egota 新江古田1.635.3 Nakano
E35 Nerima 練馬1.636.9 Nerima
E36 Toshimaen 豊島園0.937.8 SeibuIkebukuro.svg Seibu Toshima Line
E37 Nerima-kasugachō 練馬春日町1.539.3 
E38 Hikarigaoka 光が丘1.440.7 

    Rolling stock

    An Oedo Line 12-000 series trainset Toei-subway 12-301.jpg
    An Oedo Line 12-000 series trainset

    Oedo Line trains are housed and maintained at the Kiba depot, located underneath Kiba Park to the southeast of Kiyosumi-Shirakawa Station. Prior to the completion of the Oedo Line loop in 2000, servicing was performed at a depot near Hikarigaoka Station.

    Major overhaul work for Oedo Line trains is performed at the Magome depot, located south of Nishi-Magome Station on the Toei Asakusa Line. Oedo Line trains access this facility using a connecting tunnel to the Asakusa Line near Shiodome Station. Because of differences in infrastructure and technology used preventing trains on either line from accessing the other, a special Toei Class E5000 locomotive powers these ferry runs during overnight hours when the subway is closed.

    History

    The Ōedo Line was first proposed in 1968 as an incomplete loop line from Shinjuku around northern and eastern Tokyo to Azabu. This plan was amended in 1972 to complete the loop back to Shinjuku, extend it to Hikarigaoka and add a spur line to Mejiro from the northern side. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government undertook construction of the line, which was initially called Toei Line 12 (都営地下鉄12号線, Toei Chikatetsu Jūnigō-sen).

    The first segment from Hikarigaoka to Nerima began operations on 10 December 1991. The line was extended from Nerima to Shinjuku on 19 December 1997, and later from Shinjuku to Kokuritsu-Kyōgijō on 20 April 2000.

    With this extension, Shintaro Ishihara, the governor of Tokyo, named the line "Toei Oedo Line", where Oedo literally means "Great Edo", a reference to Tokyo's former name. As was the case with earlier lines, the public was initially polled to select a name; however, Ishihara rejected the chosen name, Tokyo Loop Line (東京環状線, Tōkyō Kanjō-sen), on the grounds that it would not initially form a complete loop, and that calling it such would cause confusion with the Yamanote Line and the Osaka Loop Line.

    The full line began operation on 12 December 2000. An additional station (Shiodome Station) was opened on 2 November 2002 to connect to the Yurikamome guideway transit line. Following the addition of Shiodome, the automated announcements in the trains were changed to advertise businesses and facilities near each station, a first in Tokyo (although this was already the practice on the municipal subways of Osaka and Nagoya).

    Future plans

    Starting on 18 January 2023, car 4 on all services on the Oedo line were designated as a women-only car in a bid by the railway operator to reduce sexual assaults onboard trains. [12] The restriction is in effect during the morning peak hour.

    Notes

    a. ^ Crowding levels defined by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism: [13] [14]

    100% — Commuters have enough personal space and are able to take a seat or stand while holding onto the straps or hand rails.
    150% — Commuters have enough personal space to read a newspaper.
    180% — Commuters must fold newspapers to read.
    200% — Commuters are pressed against each other in each compartment but can still read small magazines.
    250% — Commuters are pressed against each other, unable to move.

    See also

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    References

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    11. "The Sound of the Most Annoying Metro in Tokyo". 8 June 2022.
    12. "都営地下鉄大江戸線に女性専用車…平日朝ラッシュ時の4号車 2023年1月18日から" [Women-only car on the Toei Oedo Line: 4th car during the morning rush hour on weekdays From 18 January 2023]. Response Automotive Media (in Japanese). 27 November 2022. Archived from the original on 26 November 2022. Retrieved 29 November 2022.
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