Togo Palazzi

Last updated

Togo Palazzi
Togo Palazzi at NEBBHOF.jpg
Personal information
Born(1932-08-08)August 8, 1932
Union City, New Jersey, U.S.
DiedAugust 12, 2022(2022-08-12) (aged 90)
Listed height6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Listed weight205 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school Union Hill
(Union City, New Jersey)
College Holy Cross (1951–1954)
NBA draft 1954 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5th overall
Selected by the Boston Celtics
Playing career1954–1962
Position Small forward / Shooting guard
Number12, 6, 17
Career history
19541956 Boston Celtics
19561960 Syracuse Nationals
1960–1962 Scranton Miners
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points 2,382 (7.4 ppg)
Rebounds 1,113 (3.4 rpg)
Assists 233 (0.7 apg)
Stats   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Togo Anthony Palazzi (August 8, 1932 – August 12, 2022) was an American basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Boston Celtics and Syracuse Nationals.

Contents

Playing and coaching career

A 6'4" forward/guard born and raised in Union City, New Jersey, Palazzi played at Union Hill High School, where he was recognized as one of the top prep basketball players nationwide. [1] He played at the College of the Holy Cross in the 1950s and was captain of the Crusaders team that won the 1954 NIT Championship and was named MVP of the tournament. [2]

Palazzi was selected by the Boston Celtics with the fifth pick of the 1954 NBA draft. He played six seasons in the NBA as a member of the Celtics and Syracuse Nationals and averaged 7.4 points per game in his career. [2]

Palazzi coached the Holy Cross women's team from 1980 to 1985, going 103–28 as coach; he coached them to an NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament appearance in his final year, the first ever appearance by the women's team. [3]

Later life and death

Palazzi later gave speeches at basketball camps for young adults interested in the sport. He was a prominent fixture at camps such as the Scatlet Hawks Basketball Camp run by Steve Manguso in Milford, MA. Along with conducting area speeches he was the camp director of the Togo Palazzi/Sterling Recreation Basketball Camp in Sterling, Massachusetts.[ citation needed ]

Palazzi died on August 12, 2022, at the age of 90. [4]

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References

  1. Doyle, Bill. "Togo Palazzi a 'coach, mentor, friend'", Telegram & Gazette , February 14, 2015. Accessed November 26, 2019. "Palazzi was named one of the top five high school players in the nation when he played for Union Hill High School in Union City, N.J., the same hometown as his future HC teammates Earle Markey and Tommy Heinsohn."
  2. 1 2 Goode, Jon. (May 10, 2005). "No stopping Togo; Catching up with Togo Palazzi". Boston.com. Retrieved May 24, 2021.
  3. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 27, 2016. Retrieved March 18, 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. "Per the Celtics, Boston alumnus Togo Palazzi has passed away at the age of 90". USA Today. August 12, 2022. Retrieved August 13, 2022.