Tohoku Shinseien Sanatorium

Last updated
National Sanatorium Tōhoku Shinseien
Tohoku Shinseien Sanatorium
Geography
LocationSakomachi, Tome, Miyagi, Japan
Organisation
Care system HealthCare of those who had leprosy
Type National hospital run by Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (Japan)
History
Opened1939
Links
Website www.tohoku-shinseien.com
Lists Hospitals in Japan

Tōhoku Shinseien Sanatorium or National Sanatorium Tōhoku Shinseien is a sanatorium for leprosy or ex-leprosy patients situated in Tome-shi, Miyagi-ken, Japan, founded in 1939.

Contents

History

Background

Following prefectural sanatoriums, the Japanese Government decided to increase sanatoriums, starting with National Sanatorium Nagashima Aiseien Nagashima Aiseien Sanatorium in 1930. Tohoku Shinseien Sanatorium was the 6th sanatorium which was established in 1939.

Tohoku Shinseien Sanatorium

Number of Patients at the end of the fiscal year

The number of in-patients is the sum of patients which changed not only by the newly diagnosed hospitalized and those who died among in-patients, by other factors such as the number of patients who escaped or were discharged, depending on the condition of the times. Recently they were encouraged to be discharged, but the long period of the segregation policy causing leprosy stigma might influence the number of those who went into the society.

Number of in-patients
YearMalesFemalesTotal
1939391352
1940311139450
1945430175605
1955397220617
1965350204554
1975299174473
1985230157387

[2]

YearNumber of
in-patients
2003191
2004177
2005167
2006158
2007152
2008144

The number of healed, discharged patients

YearPatients
19409
194121
194213
19438
19442
19455
19463
19470
YearPatients
19480
19493
19500
19510
19521
19530
19542
19551
YearPatients
19562
19573
19582
19592
196029
19617
19626

[3]

Museum

Notes

  1. Leprosy and society(1986), Kon S, J. Iwate med Ass. 38,2,161-174
  2. Number of in-patients (residents) 2009.12.20 Archived 2009-06-23 at the Wayback Machine
  3. Jinjutsu wo Mattou Seshi Hito The history of Dr. Kamikawa Yutaka,(1970) ed. Mamoru Uchida, Tohoku Shinseien

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References

Coordinates: 38°40′56″N141°03′38″E / 38.68222°N 141.06056°E / 38.68222; 141.06056