Tokachi Province

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Location of Tokachi Province c. 1869. Japan prov map Tokachi.GIF
Location of Tokachi Province c. 1869.

Tokachi Province (十勝国, Tokachi-no kuni) was a short-lived province in Hokkaidō. It corresponded to modern-day Tokachi Subprefecture.

Contents

History

In 1820, the explorer Takeshiro Matsuura (松浦 武四郎) proposed Tokachi as the name of the province. The province was named after the Tokachi River, which in turn was derived from the Ainu language word "tokapci".

Although the exact origins of "tokapci" were unknown, Hidezo Yamada, an Ainu language researcher, proposed these origins:

After 1869, the northern Japanese island was known as Hokkaido; [1] and regional administrative subdivisions were identified, including Tokachi Province. [2]

Districts

Notes

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References