Toki Yorinari

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Toki Yorinari (土岐 頼芸, 1502–1582), also known as Toki Yoriaki, [1] was a Japanese samurai warrior of in the Sengoku period. He was shugo of Mino Province. [2] He may be equivalent to Toki Yoshiyori (土岐 頼芸, 1502–1583), also described as a Japanese samurai warrior of in the Sengoku period. [3]

Contents

Yoshiyori was a son of Toki Masafusa. [3] After the death of his father, Yoshiyori became head of the Toki clan in Mino Province. He had Ōkuwa Castle built. [3]

Yorinari was forced out of Mino by Saitō Dōsan. [2]

Yorinari was the father of Toki Jirō who was killed by Saitō. [2]

Yoshiyori was the father of Toki Yoshitatsu (1527–1561), who went into exile in 1542. [4]

See also

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References

  1. "Toki clan" at Sengoku-expo.net; retrieved 2013-5-10.
  2. 1 2 3 Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Saitō Dōsan" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 809.
  3. 1 2 3 Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Toki," Nobiliare du Japon, p. 61; retrieved 2013-5-9.
  4. Fróis, Luís (1976). Historia de Japam, Vol. I, p. 174. (in Portuguese)

Further reading