Toksong County

Last updated
Toksong County
덕성군
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja德城郡
  McCune-ReischauerTŏksŏng kun
  Revised RomanizationDeokseong-gun
DPRK2006 Hamnam-Toksong.PNG
Map of South Hamgyong showing the location of Toksong
Country North Korea
Province South Hamgyong Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 1 workers' district, 23 ri
Area
  Total1,573 km2 (607 sq mi)
Population
 (2008 [1] )
  Total97,617
  Density62/km2 (160/sq mi)

Tŏksŏng County is a county in South Hamgyŏng province, North Korea.

Contents

Geography

It is largely mountainous, but the southern area is low-lying. The Pujŏllyŏng, Taedŏk, and Kŏdubong (거두봉) ranges pass through the county. The highest point is Hŭisabong. Major streams include the Kŏsŏch'ŏn (거서천), Konp'ach'ŏn (곤파천), and Tongp'allyŏngch'ŏn (통팔령천).

Temperatures are typically quite low. About 89% of the county is forestland, of which some 70% is coniferous. Thanks to this, lumbering is an important local industry.

Administrative divisions

Tŏksŏng county is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 1 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 23 ri (villages):

  • Tŏksŏng-ŭp
  • Ch'ŏlsal-lodongjagu
  • Ch'angsŏng 1-ri
  • Ch'angsŏng 2-ri
  • Changhŭng-ri
  • Chiktong-ri
  • Chungdol-li
  • Chungdong-ri
  • Chuŭidong-ri
  • Imjadong-ri
  • Indong-ri
  • Ŏmdong-ri
  • Ŏmsŏ-ri
  • Posŏng-ri
  • Ragwŏl-li
  • Samgi-ri
  • Sangdol-li
  • Sinhŭng-ri
  • Sint'ae-ri
  • Songjung-ri
  • Susŏ-ri
  • Tŏg'udae-ri
  • Tongjung-ri
  • Yangsŭng-ri
  • Wŏlgŭndae-ri

Economy

The local economy is centred on manufacturing, although agriculture also plays a role. Manufacturing accounts for 90% of local production. Local crops include maize, soybeans, and potatoes; these are chiefly grown along the valleys. There are also orchards and silkworm farms. Mining is supported by deposits of iron ore, gold, fluorspar, and magnetite. Hydroelectric power stations can also be found in the county.

Transportation

Tŏksŏng county is served roads and by the Tŏksŏng line of the Korean State Railway.

See also

Related Research Articles

Kowon County County in South Hamgyong Province, North Korea

Kowŏn County is a county in South Hamgyŏng province, North Korea. It lies at the southern tip of the province.

Yonggwang County County in South Hamgyong, North Korea

Yŏnggwang County is a county in South Hamgyŏng province, North Korea.

Hongwon County County in South Hamgyong Province, North Korea

Hongwŏn County is a county in South Hamgyŏng province, North Korea. It is flanked by the Sea of Japan to the south, and by the Hamgyŏng Mountains to the north.

Hochon County County in South Hamgyong Province, North Korea

Hŏch'ŏn County is a county in South Hamgyŏng province, North Korea. It was created after the division of Korea, from portions of Tanch'ŏn and P'ungsan.

Anbyon County County in Kangwon Province, North Korea

Anbyŏn is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Originally included in South Hamgyŏng province, it was transferred to Kangwŏn province in a September 1946 reshuffling of local government.

Ichon County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Ich'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in northern Kangwŏn province, North Korea. The terrain is predominantly high and mountainous; the highest point is Myongidoksan, 1,585 meters above sea level. The county's borders run along the Masingryong and Ryongam ranges. The chief stream is the Rimjin River.

Kosan County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Kosan County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea.

Poptong County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Pŏptong County is a kun in the Kangwŏn province, North Korea.

Kumgang County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Kŭmgang County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Kŭmgang lies immediately north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone. It was formed in 1952 from a portion of Hoeyang County and from those sections of Yanggu, and Rinje counties that remained under Northern control after the armistice. The county takes its name from the Mount Kŭmgang, which is partially located there. The county seat, Kŭmgang-ŭp, was formerly called Malhwi-ri.

Tongchon County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

T'ongch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It abuts the Sea of Japan to the north and east. Famous people from T'ongch'ŏn include former Hyundai chairman Chung Ju-yung, who is believed to have been born there.

Sepo County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Sep'o County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It was created as a separate entity following the division of Korea.

Kimhyonggwon County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Kimhyŏnggwŏn County is a kun, or county, in southeastern Ryanggang province, North Korea. It borders South Hamgyŏng to the south. Previously known as Pungsan, it was renamed by Kim Il Sung in 1990. He named it after his uncle, Kim Hyŏng-gwŏn. It is known for its striking scenery and for the Pungsan Dog, a large breed of hunting dog.

Pochon County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Poch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang Province, North Korea. It looks westward across the Amrok River at China.

Unhung County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Unhŭng County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang Province, North Korea. It was created following the division of Korea from portions of Hyesan and Kapsan.

Yomju County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Yŏmju County is a kun, or county, in northwestern North P'yŏngan province, North Korea, on the coast of the Yellow Sea. It is bordered by Ryongch'ŏn and P'ihyŏn to the north, Tongrim to the east, and Ch'ŏlsan to the south; to the west lies the ocean. The county was created in 1952 from portions of Ch'ŏlsan and Ryongch'ŏn.

Hyangsan County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Hyangsan County is a kun, or county, in North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It was established, following the division of Korea, from portions of Nyŏngbyŏn county. The area of Myohyangsan mountain, which stands on the county's border, has been developed as a tourist destination. Accordingly, there are numerous tourism-related institutions in the Myohangsan area.

Sonchon County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Sŏnch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, on the coast of the Yellow Sea in west-central North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. To the north it borders Ch'ŏnma, to the east Kusŏng and Kwaksan, and to the west Tongrim; to the south, it borders nothing but the sea. Sŏnch'ŏn was reorganized in 1952, with two myŏn, or townships, being split off to form the new county of Tongrim.

Kwaksan County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Kwaksan County is a kun in coastal southern North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It faces the Yellow Sea to the south. By land, it is bordered by Kusŏng city in the north, Chŏngju in the east, and Sŏnch'ŏn in the west.

Pakchon County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Pakch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in southern North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It is bordered to the north by T'aech'ŏn, to the east and southeast by Nyŏngbyŏn, and to the west by Unjŏn counties. To the south, it looks across the Ch'ŏngch'ŏn River at Anju city and Mundŏk county in South P'yŏngan province. In 1952, 4 myŏn of Pakch'ŏn were split off to join Unjŏn county; since then, the county's administrative divisions have been revised in 1954, 1956, 1958, 1978, 1980, and 1982.

Pyoktong County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Pyŏktong County is a kun, or county, in northern North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It lies in the valley of the Yalu River, and borders China to the north. Within North Korea, it is bounded by Tongch'ang in the south, Ch'angsŏng in the west, and Usi county in Chagang province to the east. It was separated from Usi in 1952, as part of a nationwide reorganization of local government.

References