Tokugawa Gorōta

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Tokugawa Gorōta
徳川五郎太
Born(1711-02-25)February 25, 1711
DiedDecember 5, 1713(1713-12-05) (aged 2)
NationalityJapanese
Occupation Daimyō

Tokugawa Gorōta (徳川 五郎太, February 25, 1711 – December 5, 1713) was a Japanese daimyō of the Edo period, who ruled the Owari Domain.

Biography

Tokugawa Gorōta was the eldest son of the 4th daimyō of Owari Domain, Tokugawa Yoshimichi by his official wife, Zuishō-in, the daughter of the court noble Kujō Tsukezane. Gorōta was only two years old when his father died, and he followed only two months later at the age of three. The direct line of succession for Owari Domain passed to his uncle, Tokugawa Tsugutomo. With his death paternal line of Tokugawa Yoshinao came to end.

He was posthumously elevated to 3rd Court Rank. His grave is at the Owari Tokugawa clan temple of Kenchū-ji in Nagoya.

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References

Preceded by
Tokugawa Yoshimichi
5th (Tokugawa) daimyō of Owari
1713
Succeeded by
Tokugawa Tsugutomo