Tokugawa Harutoshi

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Tokugawa Harutoshi
Lord of Mito
In office
1805–1816
Preceded by Tokugawa Harumori
Succeeded by Tokugawa Narinobu
Personal details
Born(1773-12-07)December 7, 1773
DiedOctober 10, 1816(1816-10-10) (aged 42)
NationalityJapanese

Tokugawa Harutoshi (徳川 治紀, December 7, 1773 – October 10, 1816) was a Japanese daimyō of the Edo period, who ruled the Mito Domain. His childhood name was Tsuruchiyo (鶴千代).

Family

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References

Preceded by
Tokugawa Harumori
7th (Tokugawa) lord of Mito
1805–1816
Succeeded by
Tokugawa Narinobu