Tokugawa Narimasa

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Tokugawa Narimasa (徳川 斉匡, June 3, 1779 July 8, 1848) was a Japanese samurai of the Edo period. The son of Tokugawa Harusada, head of the Hitotsubashi-Tokugawa house, he succeeded Tokugawa Haruaki as head of the Tayasu branch of the Tokugawa house, which had been without a ruler for some time. His childhood name was Yoshinosuke (慶之丞).

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Family

Ancestry

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References

  1. "Genealogy". Reichsarchiv (in Japanese). 6 May 2010. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
Preceded by Tayasu-Tokugawa family head
1787-1836
Succeeded by