Tokugawa Naritomo

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Statue of Tokugawa Naritomo, kept at Choe-ji in Nagoya Tokugawa Naritomo.jpg
Statue of Tokugawa Naritomo, kept at Chōe-ji in Nagoya

Tokugawa Naritomo (徳川 斉朝, September 27, 1793 – May 11, 1850) was a Japanese daimyō of the Edo period, who ruled the Owari Domain. His childhood name was Yasuchiyo (愷千代).

He had a retreat north of Nagoya Castle called Shin Goten (新御殿 New Palace) in what is today Horibata-chō (堀端町). [1]

Family

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References

  1. "尾張国焼鉄道の旅13:浅間町(萩山焼)".
Japanese royalty
Preceded by 10th (Tokugawa) daimyō of Owari
1800–1827
Succeeded by