Tokugawa Takachiyo

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Tokugawa Takachiyo (徳川 寿千代, April 1, 1860 March 1, 1865) was a Japanese samurai of the late Edo period who succeeded Tokugawa Yoshiyori as incumbent to the Tayasu-Tokugawa headship.

Preceded by
Tokugawa Yoshiyori
Tayasu-Tokugawa family head
1863–1865
Succeeded by
Tokugawa Kamenosuke


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