Tokugawa Tsunashige

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Tokugawa Tsunashige (徳川 綱重, 28 June 1644 – 29 October 1678) was the third son of Tokugawa Iemitsu. His mother was Iemitsu's concubine Onatsu no Kata. His childhood name was Chomatsu (長松). When Iemitsu died in 1651, he was only 8 years old. After he was given Kofu Domain, he remained there until his death in 1678.

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Family

Ancestry

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References

  1. "Genealogy". Reichsarchiv. Retrieved 4 July 2018.(in Japanese)
Preceded by Lord of Kofu
1661-1678
Succeeded by