Tokyo 18th district

Last updated
Tokyo 18th District
東京都第18区
Parliamentary constituency
for the Japanese House of Representatives
Zhong Yi Yuan Xiao Xuan Ju Qu Dong Jing Du 2.svg
Numbered map of Tokyo single-member districts
Prefecture Tokyo
Proportional District Tokyo
Electorate444,924 (2021) [1]
Current constituency
Created1994
SeatsOne
Party Constitutional Democratic Party
Representative Naoto Kan
Created from Tokyo's 7th "medium-sized" district
Municipalities Musashino, Koganei and Fuchū

Tokyo 18th District (東京都第18区, Tōkyō-tō dai-jūhachi-ku, or 東京18区 Tōkyō jūhachi-ku) is a constituency of the House of Representatives in the Diet of Japan. It is located in Western Tokyo and consists of the cities of Musashino, Koganei and Fuchū. Until 2002, it included Mitaka (now part of Tokyo 22nd district) instead of Fuchū. As of 2016, 436,338 eligible voters were registered in the district. [2]

Contents

Before the electoral reform of 1994, the area had been part of Tokyo 7th district, where four representatives were elected by Single non-transferable vote (SNTV).

From its creation to 2012, the district was represented by former Prime Minister and popular Democratic Party co-founder Naoto Kan. In the election of 2005 it was the only constituency the opposition could defend in Tokyo against the landslide for Junichiro Koizumi's ruling coalition. In 2003, then party chairman Kan beat former Minister of Labour Kunio Hatoyama, the younger brother of Democratic Party leader Yukio Hatoyama by a margin of more than 50,000 votes.

In the election of 2009, Masatada Tsuchiya was the candidate for the ruling LDP. [3] Tsuchiya who failed to unseat Kan in 2005 was a representative for the Tokyo proportional representation block where he ranked second on the LDP's list 2005. [4] In 2009 he failed to secure reelection in the Tokyo block. Kan was elected president of the then ruling Democratic Party again in 2010 shortly before the 2010 House of Councillors election; but his cabinet resigned after only 15 months. In the 2012 House of Representatives election, Kan lost Tokyo 18th district to Masatada Tsuchiya by more than 10,000 votes; ranking third on the Democratic proportional list in Tokyo ( sekihairitsu 87.9%), he gained the last of the three Democratic seats in the Tokyo proportional block behind Banri Kaieda and Jin Matsubara. [5]

Kan joined the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan before the 2017 general election and regained the seat. Tsuchiya lost his seat even with his high sekihairitsu as he did not run for the proportional block. In 2021 Kan was challenged by a former DPJ lawmaker, Akihisa Nagashima, who had joined the LDP. Kan managed to hold his seat in a tight race that received national attention. [6] [7]

List of representatives

RepresentativePartyDatesNotes
Naoto Kan DPJ 1996–2012Re-elected in the Tokyo PR block
Masatada Tsuchiya LDP 2012–2017
Naoto Kan CDP 2017–Incumbent

Election results

2021 [8]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
CDP Naoto Kan 122,09147.12Increase2.svg6.39
Liberal Democratic Akihisa Nagashima (elected by PR)115,88144.72Increase2.svg4.43
Independent Masami Koyasu21,1518.16
Majority6,2102.40Increase2.svg1.96
Turnout 59.86Increase2.svg4.03
CDP hold Swing 0.98
2017 [9]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
CDP Naoto Kan 96,71340.73Increase2.svg1.94
Liberal Democratic Masatada Tsuchiya 95,66740.29Decrease2.svg5.50
Kibō no Tō Atsushi Tokita45,08118.98N/A
Majority1,0460.44Decrease2.svg6.76
Turnout 55.83Decrease2.svg1.60
CDP gain from Liberal Democratic Swing Increase2.svg3.72
2014 [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democratic Masatada Tsuchiya 106,14345.81Increase2.svg13.59
Democratic Naoto Kan (elected by PR)89,87738.79Increase2.svg10.46
Communist Ryo Yuuki35,69915.41Increase2.svg10.27
Majority16,2667.02Increase2.svg3.13
Turnout 57.43Decrease2.svg7.59
Liberal Democratic hold Swing Increase2.svg1.57
2012 [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democratic Masatada Tsuchiya 84,07832.22Increase2.svg0.09
Democratic Naoto Kan (elected by PR)73,94228.33Decrease2.svg31.13
Independent Katsuhito Yokokume 44,82817.18N/A
Restoration Katsuya Igarashi28,83711.05N/A
Tomorrow Yasuyuki Sugimura15,8736.08N/A
Communist Takayoshi Yanagi13,4195.14Decrease2.svg2.50
Majority10,1363.89Decrease2.svg23.44
Turnout 65.02Decrease2.svg3.22
Liberal Democratic gain from Democratic Swing Increase2.svg15.61
2009 [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Naoto Kan 163,44659.46Increase2.svg12.69
Liberal Democratic Masatada Tsuchiya 88,32532.13Decrease2.svg11.75
Communist Tamiji Koizumi 21,0047.64Decrease2.svg0.31
Happiness Realization Michie Tanabe 2,0870.76Increase2.svg0.76
Majority75,12127.33Increase2.svg24.44
Turnout 274,86268.24Increase2.svg0.20
Democratic hold Swing Increase2.svg12.22
In 2005, the ruling coalition of LDP (red) and Komeito (green) swept Tokyo's single-member districts. The opposition DPJ (blue) was reduced to one district, down from 12 in 2003. Tokyo hrdist map 2005.PNG
In 2005, the ruling coalition of LDP (red) and Kōmeitō (green) swept Tokyo's single-member districts. The opposition DPJ (blue) was reduced to one district, down from 12 in 2003.
2005 [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Naoto Kan 126,71646.77
Liberal Democratic Masatada Tsuchiya (elected by PR)118,87943.88
Communist Tōru Miyamoto 21,5427.95
Turnout 270,94968.04
2003 [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Naoto Kan 139,19557.36
Liberal Democratic Kunio Hatoyama (elected by PR)83,33734.34
Communist Motonari Kobayama 16,0106.60
Turnout 242,65262.38
2000 [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Naoto Kan 114,750
Liberal Democratic Hisanori Kataoka [15] 49,740
Communist Sadahiko Toda [16] 21,900
Liberal Takashi Kanamori [17] 16,467
Liberal League Yū Kaneko [18] 1,521
1996 [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Naoto Kan 116,910
New Frontier Takashi Kanamori24,245
Liberal Democratic Chikara Ōkubo [20] 23,566
Communist Sadahiko Toda22,488

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References

  1. "東京18区". go2senkyo. initial.inc. Retrieved 3 December 2021.
  2. Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC): 平成28年9月2日現在選挙人名簿及び在外選挙人名簿登録者数 (in Japanese)
  3. 1 2 衆議院 >第45回衆議院議員選挙 >東京都 >東京18区. ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). JANJAN. Archived from the original on 2009-04-28. Retrieved 2009-06-09.
  4. 衆議院 >第44回衆議院議員選挙 >東京>自民. ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). JANJAN . Retrieved 2009-06-09.
  5. 【比例代表】 東京(定数17). Yomiuri Shimbun (in Japanese). Retrieved 2013-03-14.
  6. "Ex-PM Naoto Kan beats former subordinate in Japan general election". Mainichi Japan. 1 November 2021. Retrieved 3 December 2021.
  7. "Affluent Tokyo Suburb Shows Why Japan's Opposition Can't Keep Up". Bloomberg. Retrieved 3 December 2021.
  8. 開票速報 小選挙区:東京 - 2021衆議 (in Japanese). NHK . Retrieved 2 November 2021.
  9. 小選挙区開票速報:東京(定数25). Asahi Shimbun (in Japanese). Retrieved 2017-11-27.
  10. 小選挙区:東京 - 開票速報 - 2014総選挙: 朝日新聞デジタル. Asahi Shimbun (in Japanese). Retrieved 2017-12-07.
  11. 第46回総選挙>小選挙区開票速報:東京都. Asahi Shimbun (in Japanese). Retrieved 2017-12-07.
  12. 衆議院 >第44回衆議院議員選挙 >東京都 >東京18区. ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). JANJAN. Archived from the original on 2009-07-05. Retrieved 2009-06-09.{{cite web}}: External link in |work= (help)
  13. 衆議院 >第43回衆議院議員選挙 >東京都 >東京18区. ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). JANJAN. Archived from the original on 2019-02-03. Retrieved 2009-06-09.{{cite web}}: External link in |work= (help)
  14. 衆議院 >第42回衆議院議員選挙 >東京都 >東京18区. ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). JANJAN. Archived from the original on 2010-07-11. Retrieved 2009-06-09.{{cite web}}: External link in |work= (help)
  15. 片岡 久議
  16. 戸田定彦
  17. 金森隆
  18. 金子遊
  19. 衆議院 >第41回衆議院議員選挙 >東京都 >東京18区. ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). JANJAN. Archived from the original on 2009-08-17. Retrieved 2009-06-09.{{cite web}}: External link in |work= (help)
  20. 大久保力
House of Representatives of Japan
Preceded by Constituency represented by the prime minister
2010–2011
Succeeded by