Tokyo Korean Junior and Senior High School

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Tokyo Korean Junior and Senior High School
東京朝鮮中高級学校
도꾜조선중고급학교
Tokyo Korean Junior and Senior High School.JPG
Address
Tokyo Korean Junior and Senior High School
2 Chome-6-32 Jūjōdai, Kita-ku, Tōkyō-to 114-0033
〒114-0033 東京都北区十条台2-6-32
Coordinates 35°45′32″N139°43′06″E / 35.7589°N 139.7183°E / 35.7589; 139.7183
Information
Website t-korean.ed.jp

Tokyo Korean Middle and High School (東京朝鮮中高級学校 Tōkyō Chōsen Chūkōkyūgakkō; Korean: Chosōngul: 도꾜조선중고급학교 Hanja: 도꾜朝鮮中高級學校) is a North Korea-aligned Korean international school in Jūjōdai  [ ja ] (十条台), Kita-ku, Tokyo. [1] As of 2013 it was one of ten North Korean-aligned high schools located in Japan. As of that year, Shin Gil-ung serves as the school's principal. [2] It operates under the Chongryon. In 2014 Isabel Reynolds of Bloomberg News described the school as "large and relatively prosperous" compared to other North Korean international schools in Japan. [3]

Contents

History

Historically the school received funding from the North Korean government and a six million yen ($63,000 US in 2013) subsidy every year from the Japanese government. Around 2011 the Japanese government made North Korea-aligned schools ineligible for tuition waivers. In 2013 the Japanese government announced that this school would no longer get subsidies. By that time funding from the North Korean government had sharply declined. [4]

Facility

The school uses gray buildings, one of which includes a clock. Isabel Reynolds of Bloomberg stated that the physical appearance of the school is similar to that of domestic Japanese schools. [3]

Curriculum

The school's curriculum is similar to that of most Japanese senior high schools. Modern history classes have their own course materials, while other classes use Korean translations of Japanese textbooks. Many female students take dance classes using Korean styles. Students in their senior (final) year take trips to North Korea. [3]

In 2014 principal Shin Gil-ung stated "It’s up to the students to decide whether they support that political system. We avoid telling them that everything North Korea does is right." [3]

Operations

A science classroom at Tokyo Korean High School with photographs of Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il Chosen-gakko classroom.jpg
A science classroom at Tokyo Korean High School with photographs of Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il

The school uses the Korean language in its official notices, and the school discourages its students from speaking Japanese while on school grounds. [3] As of 2013 all classrooms have photographs of Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il. [2] Female students and teachers wear chima jeogori . The school serves Korean foods in its cafeteria. [3] As of 2013 80% of the school's costs come from tuition and other expenses from the parents of the students. [4]

Student body

As of 2013 the school had 650 students. [2] As of 2014 about 40% of the students who graduate from this school attend universities. [3] The school's peak enrollment was in the late 1960s, with 2,300 students. [4]

See also

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References

  1. "所在地 of 東京朝鮮中高級学校" (). Tokyo Korean Junior and Senior High School. Retrieved on April 12, 2015. "東京都北区十条台2-6-32"
  2. 1 2 3 Zolbert, Alex. "Attending a North Korean school ... in Japan" (). CNN . February 4, 2013.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Reynolds, Isabel. "North Korean schools in Japan soldiering on despite tough times" (). Bloomberg News at The Japan Times . November 13, 2014. Retrieved on April 12, 2015.
  4. 1 2 3 "Class action" (). The Economist . June 15, 2013. Retrieved on April 12, 2015.

Further reading