Toller Fratrum

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Toller Fratrum
Toller Fratrum, parish church of St. Basil - geograph.org.uk - 454967.jpg
Parish church of St. Basil
Dorset UK location map.svg
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Toller Fratrum
Location within Dorset
Population10  [1]
OS grid reference SY578972
Unitary authority
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Dorchester
Postcode district DT2
Dialling code 01300
Police Dorset
Fire Dorset and Wiltshire
Ambulance South Western
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Dorset
50°46′23″N2°35′53″W / 50.773°N 2.598°W / 50.773; -2.598 Coordinates: 50°46′23″N2°35′53″W / 50.773°N 2.598°W / 50.773; -2.598

Toller Fratrum ( /ˈfrtrəm/ ) is a very small village and civil parish in Dorset, England, near Maiden Newton, anciently in Tollerford Hundred.

The name is taken from the village's situation on the brook formerly known as the Toller, now called the Hooke. The addition Fratrum is the Latin for of the brothers and refers to the mediaeval ownership of the manor by the Knights Hospitaller, which distinguishes it from the other Tollers, namely Toller Porcorum and Toller Whelme. It is often referred to as Little Toller.

The village has a notable 16th-century farm house, Little Toller Farm, built largely by John Samways, who acquired the estate in 1540. The farm house was later occupied by the Fulford family. The church of Saint Basil was rebuilt in the 19th century but possesses not only an unusual Norman font, carved with archaic figures, but also a relief of Saint Mary Magdalene of the same period. Sir Francis Fulford, who acquired Toller Fratrum through marriage into the Samways family, was buried here in 1664.

The independent book publisher, Little Toller Books, is based in the village.

Dorset County Council's latest (2013) estimate of the population of the parish is 10. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Parish Population Data". Dorset County Council. 20 January 2015. Retrieved 11 March 2015.