Tomás Godoy Cruz

Last updated
Tomas Godoy Cruz Dr.tomas godoy cruz.jpg
Tomás Godoy Cruz

Tomás Godoy Cruz (May 6, 1791 May 15, 1852) was an Argentine statesman and businessman. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which on July 9, 1816 declared the Independence of Argentina.

Godoy Cruz was born in Mendoza. He studied in Mendoza, then in Chile at the Royal University of San Felipe, graduating in philosophy, canonical and civil law. He lived in Chile until 1814, and served in the Santiago Cabildo (council) during the last year of his stay. He then returned to Mendoza, setting up a gunpowder factory. He agitated to make General José de San Martín governor of Cuyo, and helped finance the Army of the Andes.

In 1815, at just 24 years old, Godoy Cruz was elected by Mendoza to the Tucumán Congress and served in 1816 for the declaration. He was president on two occasions and vice-president on one. He subsequently served as governor of Mendoza Province 1820–22. In 1831 he was exiled to Chile where he was a teacher and pioneered silkworm cultivation. He was also a successful merchant of woven goods.

The city of Godoy Cruz and its surrounding department in Mendoza, and streets across the country were named in his honour.

Related Research Articles

Mendoza Province Province of Argentina

Mendoza, officially Province of Mendoza, is a province of Argentina, in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. It borders San Juan to the north, La Pampa and Neuquén to the south, San Luis to the east, and the republic of Chile to the west; the international limit is marked by the Andes mountain range. Its capital city is the homonymous city of Mendoza.

Argentine Declaration of Independence Historical procalamation

What today is commonly referred as the Independence of Argentina was declared on July 9, 1816, by the Congress of Tucumán. In reality, the congressmen who were assembled in Tucumán declared the independence of the United Provinces of South America, which is one of the official names of the Argentine Republic. The Federal League Provinces, at war with the United Provinces, were not allowed into the Congress. At the same time, several provinces from the Upper Peru that would later become part of present-day Bolivia, were represented at the Congress.

Francisco Narciso de Laprida

Francisco Narciso de Laprida was an Argentine lawyer and politician. He was a representative for San Juan at the Congress of Tucumán, and its president on July 9, 1816, when the Declaration of Independence of Argentina was declared.

Godoy Cruz Antonio Tomba

Club Deportivo Godoy Cruz Antonio Tomba, known simply as Godoy Cruz, is an Argentine sports club from Godoy Cruz, Mendoza. The club is best known for its football team, that plays in the Primera División, the top level of the Argentine football league system.

Godoy Cruz, Mendoza City in Mendoza, Argentina

Godoy Cruz is a city in the province of Mendoza, Argentina. It has 183,000 inhabitants as per the 2001 census [INDEC], and is part of the metropolitan area of the provincial capital (Mendoza).

Mariano Boedo

Mariano Joaquin Boedo born Mariano Joaquin de Boedo y de Aguirre, was an Argentine statesman and soldier. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which on 9 July 1816 declared the Independence of Argentina, signing the Declaration of Independence as a vice president of the Congress.

José Eusebio Colombres

José Eusebio Colombres was an Argentine statesman and bishop. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán of 9 July 1816 which declared the Independence of Argentina, and is credited with the foundation of the important sugar cane industry in Tucumán Province.

The Congress of Tucumán was the representative assembly, initially meeting in San Miguel de Tucumán, that declared the independence of the United Provinces of South America on July 9, 1816, from the Spanish Empire.

Juan Agustín Maza

Juan Agustín Maza was an Argentine statesman and lawyer. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which on 9 July 1816 declared the Independence of Argentina.

Teodoro Sánchez de Bustamante

Teodoro Sánchez de Bustamante was an Argentine statesman, lawyer and soldier. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which on 9 July 1816 declared the Independence of Argentina.

Justo de Santa María de Oro

Justo de Santa María de Oro y Albarracín was an Argentine statesman and bishop. He was an influential representative in the Congress of Tucumán, which on 9 July 1816, declared the Independence of Argentina.

Pedro Ignacio de Castro Barros

Pedro Ignacio de Castro Barros was an Argentine statesman and priest. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which on 9 July 1816 declared the Independence of Argentina.

Pedro León Gallo

Pedro León Díaz Gallo was an Argentine statesman and priest. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which on 9 July 1816 declared the Independence of Argentina.

Nicolás Andrés Olmedo is an Argentine football midfielder.

José Antonio Álvarez Condarco

José Antonio Álvarez Condarco (1780–1855) was an Argentinian soldier, manufacturer of explosives and cartographer. He also served as Aide-de-camp and private secretary to general José de San Martín.

Republic of Tucumán

The Republic of Tucumán was a short-lived state centered on the town of San Miguel de Tucumán in today's Argentina that was formed after the collapse of central authority in 1820, and that broke up the next year. The "Republic" remained a political unit within the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata.

José Videla Castillo was an Argentine military officer who fought in his country's war of independence and later in the Argentine Civil Wars on the Unitarian side.

Daniel Aníbal Hernández is an Argentine former footballer who played as a midfielder for clubs in Argentina, Bolivia and Chile.

Alfredo Cornejo (politician) Argentine politician

Alfredo Cornejo is an Argentine politician. He leads the Radical Civic Union and is a National Deputy since 2019. He was Governor of Mendoza Province from 2015 to 2019.

References

Preceded by
Pedro José Campos
Governor of Mendoza
1820 - 1822
Succeeded by
Pedro Molina y Sotomayor
Preceded by
Judges of First Instance
Governor of Mendoza (acting)
1830
Succeeded by
José Videla Castillo