Tom Acker

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Tom Acker
Tom Acker.jpg
Pitcher
Born:(1930-03-07)March 7, 1930
Paterson, New Jersey
Died: January 4, 2021(2021-01-04) (aged 90)
Narvon, Pennsylvania
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 20, 1956, for the Cincinnati Redlegs
Last MLB appearance
September 20, 1959, for the Cincinnati Redlegs
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 19–13
Earned run average 4.12
Strikeouts 256
Teams

Thomas James Acker (March 7, 1930 – January 4, 2021) was an American baseball pitcher who played four seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played his entire career for the Cincinnati Reds from 1956 to 1959. He batted and threw right-handed and served primarily as a relief pitcher.

Contents

Acker was signed as an amateur free agent by the New York Giants in 1948 and played for two of their minor league affiliates until 1950, when the Buffalo Bisons drafted him in that year's minor league draft. After spending one season with the organization, he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds in October 1951, the same month he drafted into the US Army. As a result, he missed the 1952 and 1953 seasons. Upon his return, he pitched in the minors until 1956, when the Redlegs promoted him to the major leagues. He played his last game on September 20, 1959.

Early life

Acker was born in Paterson, New Jersey, on March 7, 1930. [1] His father, Tom Sr., worked as a police officer in Fair Lawn, New Jersey. Consequently, Acker grew up in that city and attended Fair Lawn High School. [2] There, he pitched for the school team that won its league and state championships from 1946 to 1948. [3] In his senior year, he compiled a 9–0 win–loss record and 102 strikeouts in 63 innings pitched. [2] He was signed as an amateur free agent by the New York Giants before the 1948 season. [1]

Professional career

Minor leagues

Acker began his professional baseball career with the Oshkosh Giants, a minor league baseball team that were members of the Wisconsin State League. [4] During his first year with the team, he recorded a 3–6 win–loss record and a 5.06 earned run average (ERA) in 80 innings pitched. His performance improved in his second season, with a 14–7 record, a 3.18 ERA, and 213 strikeouts over 201 innings, [4] helping the Giants secure the pennant. [2] This earned him a promotion to the Class-B Knoxville Smokies of the Tri-State League in the following year. Although Acker finished the 1950 season with fewer wins (6), he managed to lower his ERA to 3.07 across 132 innings pitched. [4] The Smokies won the pennant, [2] and he was subsequently selected by the Buffalo Bisons in the minor league draft at the end of the year. [1]

In his only season with the Bisons, Acker compiled a 10–13 win–loss record, a 3.69 ERA, and 111 strikeouts in 29 starts. He also recorded 11 complete games and 2 shutouts that year. [4] He was traded to the Cincinnati Reds along with Moe Savransky on October 14, 1951, for Jim Bolger. [1] Later that same month, he was chosen in the Selective Service draft and joined the US Army. [2] Consequently, Acker did not play professional baseball from 1952 to 1953. Upon his return from military service, he was placed with the Class-AA Tulsa Oilers. There, he finished with a 7–8 record, a 5.08 ERA, and 102 strikeouts over 15 starts. He rebounded in 1955 with the Nashville Volunteers, where he improved his win–loss record (11–8) and ERA (3.26) and made 10 additional starts compared to the previous season. [4]

Cincinnati Reds (1956–1959)

Acker made his Major League Baseball debut on April 20, 1956, at the age of 26, [1] relieving Hal Jeffcoat and giving up one earned run and striking out three (including Gene Baker, Acker's first batter faced) [2] over 2 innings in a 12–1 loss to the Chicago Cubs. [5] Overall, he finished his first season in the major leagues with a 4–3 record and a 2.37 ERA in 83 23 innings. He started 7 of the 29 games in which he pitched, [1] and also recorded the only shutout of his major league career against the Philadelphia Phillies on September 19. [1] [6]

The majority of Acker's 153 appearances were as a relief pitcher, but he did start 23 games. During his career, he had 256 strikeouts in 380 13 total innings. His K/9IP was 6.06, which was higher than the National League average at that time. In 1957 he finished in the National League top ten for games pitched, winning percentage, and hit batsmen. Acker handled 68 out of 69 total chances successfully for a fielding percentage of .986 during his four seasons. [1]

Acker played his final major league game on September 20, 1959, at the age of 29. He was subsequently traded to the Kansas City Athletics for Frank House on November 21 that same year. [1] The Athletics assigned him to Richmond Virginians, where he briefly played in 1960. [4] He was unconditionally released after he declined a move to the Dallas Rangers of the American Association, given his reluctance to displace his family across the country. [2]

Personal life

Acker married his first wife, Trudy, during his stint in the military. Together, they had two daughters: Nancy and Janice. He also had three stepsons from his subsequent marriage to Barbara. They remained married until his death. [2]

He was enshrined into the Fair Lawn Athletics Hall of Fame in 2006. [7]

Acker died on January 4, 2021, at his home in Narvon, Pennsylvania. He was 90. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "Tom Acker Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Schwartz, Paul (January 10, 2021). "Tom Acker, former Major League pitcher and Bergen County legend, dies at age 90". NorthJersey.com. North Jersey Media Group. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  3. Christianson, Cornell; Diepeveen, Jane Lyle (February 3, 2014). Legendary Locals of Fair Lawn. Arcadia Publishing. p. 77. ISBN   9781467101066.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Tom Acker Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  5. "April 20, 1956 Cincinnati Redlegs at Chicago Cubs Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. April 20, 1956. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  6. "September 19, 1956 Cincinnati Redlegs at Philadelphia Phillies Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. September 19, 1956. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  7. Samuels, Montana (January 11, 2021). "MLB Pitcher, North Jersey Baseball Icon Tom Acker Dies At 90". Patch Media. Hale Global. Retrieved January 11, 2021.