Tom Armstrong (politician)

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Tom Armstrong
Personal details
Born(1903-09-13)13 September 1903
Lambton, New South Wales
Died16 March 1957(1957-03-16) (aged 53)
Lambton, New South Wales
Political partyIndependent Labor

Thomas Armstrong (13 September 1903 – 16 March 1957) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the New South Wales Parliament from 1953 until his death in 1957. He was independent but generally supported the Labor Party government of Joseph Cahill. Armstrong was born and educated to elementary level in Lambton, New South Wales. He was the son of a coal-miner and began working as a miner at Wallsend Colliery at age 14. He eventually became an ironworker at the Newcastle Steel Works and became an official of the Federated Ironworkers' Association. He was elected as an alderman of Newcastle City Council between 1941 and 1953 and was the Mayor of Newcastle in 1952.

State Politics

Armstrong was elected as the member for Kahibah at a by-election, [1] caused by the resignation of Joshua Arthur who was found guilty by a Royal Commission of improper business dealings. He was re-elected at the 1956 election, [2] but died a year later. [3]

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A by-election was held for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Kahibah on 31 October 1953. It was triggered by the forced resignation of Labor MLA Joshua Arthur, after a Royal Commission found his dealings with Reginald Doyle were improper. and was won by independent candidate Tom Armstrong.

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References

  1. Green, Antony. "1953 Kahibah by-election". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  2. Green, Antony. "1956 Kahibah". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  3. "Mr Thomas Armstrong (2)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 3 May 2019.

 

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Joshua Arthur
Member for Kahibah
1953 1957
Succeeded by
Jack Stewart