Tom Asmussen

Last updated
Tom Asmussen
Catcher
Born:(1878-09-26)September 26, 1878
Chicago
Died: August 21, 1963(1963-08-21) (aged 84)
Arlington Heights, Illinois
Batted: Unknown
Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 10, 1907, for the  Boston Doves
Last MLB appearance
August 19, 1907, for the  Boston Doves
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This biographical article relating to a United States baseball catcher born in the 1870s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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