Tom Brindle (politician)

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  1. 1 2 "Upper House". Auckland Star . Vol. LXVII, no. 59. 10 March 1936. p. 9. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Gustafson 1980, p. 155.
  3. 1 2 3 "Biographical Notes". The Evening Post . Vol. CXXI, no. 59. 10 March 1936. p. 10. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  4. Greenaway, Richard L. N. (June 2007). "Sydenham Cemetery Tour" (PDF). Christchurch City Libraries. p. 16. Retrieved 30 July 2013.
  5. "Crimes (Repeal of Seditious Offences) Amendment Bill — Second Reading". New Zealand Parliament . Retrieved 5 March 2014.
  6. "By-election". New Zealand Times. Vol. XLIII, no. 10147. 9 December 1918. p. 4. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  7. Gustafson 1980, p. 139.
  8. The New Zealand Official Year-Book. Government Printer. 1920. Archived from the original on 1 September 2014. Retrieved 2 August 2013.
  9. "Official Counts". The Evening Post . Vol. CIV, no. 144. 15 December 1922. p. 8. Retrieved 3 March 2014.
  10. "South Island". Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle. Vol. XXI, no. 1055. 10 November 1925. p. 1. Retrieved 5 March 2014.
  11. The General Election, 1928. Government Printer. 1929. p. 6. Retrieved 4 December 2013.
  12. "Declaration of Result of Poll for the Electoral District of Wellington Suburbs". New Zealand Truth . No. 1200. 29 November 1928. p. 14. Retrieved 5 March 2014.
  13. "Declaration of Result of Poll for the Electoral District of Wellington Suburbs". The Evening Post . Vol. CXII, no. 140. 10 December 1931. p. 2. Retrieved 5 March 2014.
  14. "Legislative Council". The Evening Post . Vol. CXXI, no. 59. 10 March 1936. p. 10. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  15. "Official jubilee medals". The Evening Post . Vol. CXIX, no. 105. 6 May 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 19 March 2014.
  16. Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First edition published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. p. 150. OCLC   154283103.
  17. "Mr. T. Brindle dies suddenly at Otaki". Gisborne Herald . Vol. LXXVII, no. 23415. 21 November 1950. p. 8.

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References

Tom Brindle
Tom Brindle - 1940s.jpg
6th President of the Labour Party
In office
7 July 1922 7 April 1926
Party political offices
Preceded by President of the Labour Party
1922–1926
Succeeded by