Tom Bundy

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Tom Bundy
Tom Bundy LCCN2014689494 (cropped).jpg
Tom Bundy at the U.S. National Championships
Full nameThomas Clark Bundy
Country (sports)Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Born(1881-10-08)October 8, 1881
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
DiedOctober 13, 1945(1945-10-13) (aged 64)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Singles
Grand Slam singles results
US Open F (1910Ch)
Doubles
Grand Slam doubles results
US Open W (1912, 1913, 1914)

Thomas Clark Bundy (October 8, 1881 – October 13, 1945) was a tennis player from Los Angeles, California, who was active in the early 20th century. With Maurice McLoughlin, he won three doubles titles at the U.S. National Championships. Bundy Drive, a major thoroughfare in West Los Angeles, is named for him and his tennis star wife May the first American to win Wimbledon. [1]

Contents

Tennis career

Bundy won the All-Comers singles final against Beals Wright, but finished runner-up to William Larned in a five-set Challenge Round at the U.S. National Championships in 1910. [2] [3] He also reached the semifinals in 1909 and 1911. Bundy won three consecutive doubles titles at the championships, alongside Maurice McLoughlin, in 1912, 1913, and 1914. [4]

When the Los Angeles Tennis Club was founded in 1920 Bundy was elected as its first president. [5]

Personal life

On December 11, 1912 Bundy married tennis player U.S. National Championships and Wimbledon champion May Sutton. [6] They separated in 1923 and were divorced in 1940. The couple had four children including daughter Dorothy Cheney, a tennis player who won the singles title at the 1938 Australian Championships. [6]

Grand Slam finals

Singles (1 runner-up)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfaceOpponentScore
Loss 1910 U.S. National Championships Grass Flag of the United States (1908-1912).svg William Larned 1–6, 7–5, 0–6, 8–6, 1–6

Doubles (3 titles, 2 runner-ups)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfacePartnerOpponentsScore
Loss 1910 U.S. National ChampionshipsGrass Flag of the United States (1908-1912).svg Trowridge Hendrick Flag of the United States (1908-1912).svg Fred Alexander
Flag of the United States (1908-1912).svg Harold Hackett
1–6, 6–8, 3–6
Win 1912 U.S. National ChampionshipsGrass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Maurice McLoughlin Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Raymond Little
Flag of the United States.svg Gustave Touchard
3–6, 6–2, 6–1, 7–5
Win 1913 U.S. National ChampionshipsGrass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Maurice McLoughlin Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg John Strachan
Flag of the United States.svg Clarence Griffin
6–4, 7–5, 6–1
Win 1914 U.S. National ChampionshipsGrass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Maurice McLoughlin Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg George Church
Flag of the United States.svg Dean Mathey
6–4, 6–2, 6–4
Loss 1915 U.S. National ChampionshipsGrass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Maurice McLoughlin Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Bill Johnston
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Clarence Griffin
6–2, 3–6, 4–6, 6–3, 3–6

Grand Slam tournament singles performance timeline

Key
W F SFQF#RRRQ#DNQANH
(W) winner; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (DNQ) did not qualify; (A) absent; (NH) not held; (SR) strike rate (events won / competed); (W–L) win–loss record.
Tournament19091910191119121913
Australian Open AAAAA
Wimbledon AAAAA
US Open SF FCh SF 4R 2R

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References

  1. "MAY SUTTON BUNDY (1887 – 1975) First American to Win Wimbledon"
  2. "Larned works Bundy" . The Baltimore Sun . August 26, 1910. p. 10 via Newspapers.com. For the fourth consecutive time and for the sixth time in his career as tennis player William A. Larned, of Summit, N. J., today won the challenge match of the singles championship of the United States, defeating Thos. C. Bundy, of Los Angeles, Cal., on the Casin courts, 6–1, 5–7, 6–0, 6–8, 6–1
  3. Bill Talbert (1967). Tennis Observed. Barre: Barre Publishers. pp. 84–85. OCLC   172306.
  4. "US National/US Open Championships" (PDF). usta.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-08-12. Retrieved 2009-06-24.
  5. Baltzell, E. Digby (1995). Sporting Gentlemen : Men's Tennis from the Age of Honor to the Cult of the Superstar. New York [u.a.]: Free Press. p. 233. ISBN   9780029013151.
  6. 1 2 "Bundy of tennis fame dies at 64" . The Los Angeles Times . October 14, 1945. p. 2 via Newspapers.com.