Tom Cain (footballer)

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Tom Cain
Personal information
Full name Thomas Cain
Date of birth 12 October 1874
Place of birth Sunderland, England
Date of death 1897 (aged 23) [1]
Position(s) Goalkeeper
Youth career
Hebburn Argyle
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1893–1894 Stoke 11 (0)
1894–1895 Everton 11 (0)
1895–1896 Southampton St. Mary's 10 (0)
1896 Grimsby Town 2 (0)
1896–1897 Hebburn Argyle
1897 West Stanley
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

Thomas Cain (12 October 1874 – 1897) [1] [2] was an English footballer who played as goalkeeper for Stoke, Everton and Southampton St. Mary's in the 1890s. [3]

Contents

Football career

Cain was born in Sunderland and started his career with Hebburn Argyle before joining Stoke in 1893, where he took over in goal from the injured Bill Rowley for eleven league matches during the 1893–94 season. [3]

In April 1894, he moved to Everton, making his first team debut as a replacement for the out of form Richard Williams in a 3–1 victory over Bolton Wanderers on 6 October 1894. [4] Cain retained his place for a further nine league matches, before Williams was recalled. After two further appearances in March, Cain moved to the south coast to join Southampton St. Mary's for their second season in the Southern League.

In his Southampton debut, Cain replaced Walter Cox, but underwent a goalkeeper's nightmare, conceding seven goals away to Clapton on 19 October 1895. Despite this setback, he retained his place, although he missed several key games through injury, being replaced by the on-loan "Gunner" Reilly or by Cox. [5]

Following the arrival of George Clawley, Cain moved on again at the end of the season, returning to the Football League with Grimsby Town for a then Southampton club record transfer fee of £20. Despite this fee, Cain only made two League appearances for Grimsby before returning to Hebburn Argyle in October. [6]

Career statistics

ClubSeasonLeagueFA CupTotal
DivisionAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
Stoke [3] 1893–94 First Division 11000110
Everton 1894–95 First Division11000110
Southampton St. Mary's 1895–96 Southern League 10000100
Grimsby Town 1896–97 Second Division 200020
Career Total34000340

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References

  1. 1 2 Tom Cain at the English National Football Archive (subscription required)
  2. Chalk, Gary; Holley, Duncan; Bull, David (2013). All the Saints: A Complete Players' Who's Who of Southampton FC. Southampton: Hagiology Publishing. p. 34. ISBN   978-0-9926-8640-6.
  3. 1 2 3 Matthews, Tony (1994). The Encyclopaedia of Stoke City. Lion Press. ISBN   0-9524151-0-0.
  4. "Bolton Wanderers 1 - Everton 3". www.evertonfc.com. 6 October 1894. Retrieved 25 April 2009.
  5. Chalk, Gary; Holley, Duncan (1987). Saints – A complete record. Breedon Books. pp. 18–19. ISBN   0-907969-22-4.
  6. Holley, Duncan; Chalk, Gary (1992). The Alphabet of the Saints. ACL & Polar Publishing. p. 59. ISBN   0-9514862-3-3.