Tom Carey (second baseman)

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Tom Carey
Tom Carey 1940 Play Ball.jpeg
Second baseman
Born:(1906-10-11)October 11, 1906
Hoboken, New Jersey
Died: February 21, 1970(1970-02-21) (aged 63)
Rochester, New York
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 19, 1935, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
July 7, 1946, for the Boston Red Sox
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