Tom Dandelet

Last updated
Tom Dandelet
Biographical details
Born(1897-08-01)August 1, 1897
Faribault, Minnesota, U.S.
DiedMarch 30, 1950(1950-03-30) (aged 52)
Huntington, West Virginia, U.S.
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1922–1923 Jonesboro Aggies
1931–1934 Marshall
Basketball
1931–1935 Marshall
Head coaching record
Overall18–29–3 (college football)
43–35 (college basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 WVIAC (1931)

Thomas Edward Dandelet (August 1, 1897 – March 30, 1950) was an American college football and college basketball coach. He served as the head football coach at the First District Agricultural School of Jonesboro, Arkansas—now known as Arkansas State University—from 1922 to 1923 and at Marshall College—now known as Marshall University—from 1931 to 1934, compiling a career college football record of 18–29–3. Dandelet was also the head basketball coach at Marshall from 1931 to 1935, tallying a mark of 43–35.

Contents

Career

From 1922 to 1923, Dandelet coached at the First District Agricultural School in Jonesboro, Arkansas, where he compiled an 0–13–1 record. Returning to the Tri-State (West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky) area, Dandelet played for semi-professional football teams like Armco Steel in Catlettsburg, Kentucky, and with early National Football League teams like the Ironton (Ohio) Tanks and Portsmouth (Ohio) Spartans (today's Detroit Lions organization), while coaching football at his alma mater, the Wonders of Ceredo-Kenova High School in nearby Wayne County, West Virginia.

From 1931 to 1934, Dandelet coached at Marshall, where he compiled an 18–16–2 record despite being underfunded and out-manned often in the Buckeye Conference, which included the University of Cincinnati, Ohio University, the University of Dayton, Miami University and Ohio Wesleyan University. After being released as football coach to make way for Cam Henderson to assume the Herd football and basketball jobs, Dandelet remained as a professor in the Health, Physical Education and Recreation Department and was also Dean of Men through 1950 at Marshall College.

Dandelet died of a heart attack at his home in Huntington, West Virginia on March 30, 1950. [1] [2]

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Jonesboro Aggies (Independent)(1922–1923)
1922 Jonesboro Aggies0–7
1923 Jonesboro Aggies0–6–1
Jonesboro Aggies:0–13–1
Marshall Thundering Herd (West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference)(1931–1932)
1931 Marshall 6–34–11st
1932 Marshall 6–2–1
Marshall Thundering Herd (Buckeye Athletic Association)(1933–1934)
1933 Marshall 3–5–11–3–15th
1934 Marshall 3–60–45th
Marshall:18–16–2
Total:18–29–3
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. "Tom Dandelet Dies". The Logan Daily News. Logan, Ohio. Associated Press. March 30, 1950. p. 5. Retrieved January 31, 2016 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "West Virginia Vital Research Records". West Virginia Division of Culture and History. Retrieved January 31, 2016.