Tom Dennis (snooker player)

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Thomas Arthur Dennis
Tom Dennis, Billiards player.jpg
Tom Dennis, Billiards player
Born1882
Nottingham, England
DiedJanuary 1940 (aged 57)
Nottingham, England
Sport countryFlag of England.svg  England
Professional1926–1936

Thomas Arthur Dennis (1882 – January 1940) [1] was an English professional snooker and English billiards player.

Contents

Career

Dennis reached the final of the World Championship in 1927, 1929, 1930, and 1931, but was beaten every time by Joe Davis. [1] The closest Dennis came to defeating Davis was in the 1931 tournament, when the pair were the only two entrants. The match, played in the back room of his own pub in Nottingham, saw Dennis lead 14-10 and 19–16, before losing 21–25. He competed in two more championships, making his last appearance in 1933. He also reached the final of the tournament in 1927, losing again to Davis in the final 11–20. After his final loss in 1931, he played in the event twice more, losing in the semi-final on both occasions, to Clark McConachy, and Willie Smith respectively.

Dennis had to withdraw from the 1936 World Snooker Championship after having an operation on his right eye. [2]

Personal life

He had three sons: Thomas Leslie, William Henry by his first wife and David [3] with his second wife, Kathleen. [4] William was a successful amateur snooker player, reaching the final of the 1937 English Amateur Championship, losing 5–3 to Kingsley Kennerley. [1]

Career finals

Non-ranking finals: 4

OutcomeYearChampionshipOpponent in the finalScore
Runner-up 1927 World Snooker Championship Flag of England.svg Joe Davis 11–20
Runner-up 1929 World Snooker Championship Flag of England.svg Joe Davis 14–19
Runner-up 1930 World Snooker Championship Flag of England.svg Joe Davis 12–25
Runner-up 1931 World Snooker Championship Flag of England.svg Joe Davis 21–25

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Sudden death of Mr T A Dennis – Well-known Notts billiards professional" . Nottingham Evening Post. 17 January 1940. Retrieved 9 November 2015 via British Newspaper Archive.
  2. "Tom Dennis's bad luck – Has to withdraw from snooker championship" . Nottingham Evening Post. 31 March 1936. Retrieved 9 November 2015 via British Newspaper Archive.
  3. England & Wales, Birth Index: 1916-2005, Births registered in Jul, Aug & Sept 1939
  4. England & Wales, Marriage Index: 1916-2005, Marriages registered in Jan, Feb, March 1939