Tom Dewar

Last updated

Tom Dewar
Born(1913-06-10)June 10, 1913
Frobisher, Saskatchewan, Canada
Died July 23, 1982(1982-07-23) (aged 69)
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Left
Played for New York Rangers
National teamFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Playing career 19341944
Tom Dewar
Medal record
Men's ice hockey
Representing Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada
World Championships
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1934 Italy

Thomas "Moose" Dewar (June 10, 1913 – July 23, 1982) was a Canadian ice hockey defenceman. He played in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the New York Rangers.

Contents

Dewar was a member of the Saskatoon Quakers who represented Canada at the 1934 World Ice Hockey Championships held in Milan, Italy where they won Gold. [1] [2]

See also

Related Research Articles

Ice Hockey World Championships Recurring international ice hockey tournament for mens national teams

The Ice Hockey World Championships are an annual international men's ice hockey tournament organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). First officially held at the 1920 Summer Olympics, it is the sport's highest profile annual international tournament. The IIHF was created in 1908 while the European Championships, the precursor to the World Championships, were first held in 1910. The tournament held at the 1920 Summer Olympics is recognized as the first Ice Hockey World Championship. From 1920 to 1968, the Olympic hockey tournament was also considered the World Championship for that year.

Canada mens national ice hockey team Mens national ice hockey team representing Canada

The Canada men's national ice hockey team is the ice hockey team representing Canada internationally. The team is overseen by Hockey Canada, a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation. From 1920 until 1963, Canada's international representation was by senior amateur club teams. Canada's national men's team was founded in 1963 by Father David Bauer as a part of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association, playing out of the University of British Columbia. The nickname "Team Canada" was first used for the 1972 Summit Series and has been frequently used to refer to the Canadian national team ever since.

Czech Republic mens national ice hockey team mens national ice hockey team representing the Czech Republic

The Czech men's national ice hockey team is the national ice hockey team of the Czech Republic. It is one of the most successful national ice hockey teams in the world and a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, Finland, Russia, Sweden and the United States. It is governed by the Czech Ice Hockey Association. The Czech Republic has 72,075 players officially enrolled in organized hockey.

Soviet Union national ice hockey team former mens national ice hockey team representing the Soviet Union

The Soviet national ice hockey team was the national ice hockey team of the Soviet Union. The team won nearly every world championship and Olympic tournament between 1954 and 1991 and never failed to medal in any International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) tournament they competed in.

2005 IIHF Womens World Championship 2005 edition of the IIHF Womens World Championship

The 2005 IIHF World Women's Championships was held April 2–9, 2005, in Linköping, at Cloetta Center, and Norrköping, at Himmelstalundshallen, in Sweden. USA won their first ever gold medal at the World Championships, defeating the defending champions Canada in a penalty shootout. Sweden won their first ever medal at the World Women Championships, defeating Finland 5 – 2 in the bronze medal game. The championship was expanded to nine teams for 2006, so there was no relegation at any level.

Finland womens national ice hockey team womens national ice hockey team representing Finland

The Finnish women's national ice hockey team represents Finland at the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Women's Championships, the Olympic Games, the Four Nations Cup, and other international-level women's ice hockey competitions. The women's national team is overseen by the Finnish Ice Hockey Association. Finland's national women's program is ranked third in the world by the IIHF and has 5,858 active players as of 2019.

2008 IIHF Womens World Championship 2008 edition of the IIHF Womens World Championship

The 2008 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships were held from April 4 to 12, 2008, in Harbin, People's Republic of China. It was the 11th event, and was run by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF).

The 1930 Ice Hockey World Championships were held between January 30 and February 10, 1930, in Chamonix, France, Vienna, Austria, and Berlin, Germany. This event was the first world championships independent of hockey at the Olympics.

Sergei Alexandrovich Demagin is a Belarusian professional ice hockey forward who is currently an unrestricted free agent. He most recently played with Arlan Kokshetau of the Kazakhstan Hockey Championship.

Clifford Frederick Lake was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Cosford Reynold Woods was a Canadian ice hockey goaltender.

Les Bird was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Jim Dewey was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Elmer Ferdinand Piper was a Canadian ice hockey player and coach.

Albert Frank "Ab" Rogers was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Bert Stanley Scharfe was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Ronald Frederick Silver was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Raymond Ralph Watkins was a Canadian ice hockey player.

Albert Myles "Ab" Welsh was a Canadian ice hockey player. Welsh was a member of the Saskatoon Quakers who represented Canada at the 1934 World Ice Hockey Championships held in Milan, Italy where they won Gold.

Harold Lawrence "Hobb" Wilson was a Canadian ice hockey player.

References

  1. IIHF (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. p. 126. ISBN   978-0-9867964-0-1.
  2. Holland, Dave (2008). Canada on Ice; The World Hockey Championships, 1920–2008. Canada On Ice productions. pp. 39–39. ISBN   978-0-9808936-0-1.