Tom Dowling (American football)

Last updated
Tom Dowling
Biographical details
Born(1940-03-08)March 8, 1940
Springfield, Kentucky, U.S.
DiedJanuary 7, 2018(2018-01-07) (aged 77)
Georgetown, Kentucky, U.S.
Playing career
1957–1960 Georgetown (KY)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1969–1972 Georgetown (KY) (assistant)
1973–1976 Georgetown (KY)
1977–1983 Liberty Baptist
1985–1995 Cumberland (KY)
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1995–2002 MSC (commissioner)
Head coaching record
Overall111–107–4
Tournaments0–1 (NAIA D-II playoffs)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 MSC (1987–1988)

Thomas Walter Dowling (March 8, 1940 – January 7, 2018) was an American college football coach and athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky from 1973 to 1976, Liberty Baptist College—now known as Liberty University—in Lynchburg, Virginia from 1977 to 1983, and Cumberland College—now known as the University of the Cumberlands—in Williamsburg, Kentucky from 1995 to 2002, compiling a career head coaching record of 111–107–4. Dowling was the commissioner of the Mid-South Conference (MSC) from 1995 to 2002.

Contents

A graduate of Georgetown College, Dowling coached for over 30 years on the collegiate level. His coaching tree includes Mike Ayers of Wofford College. Both Ayers' son, Travis Dowling, and his grandson, Ezra Dowling, are named for Dowling.

Playing career

Dowling played football at Georgetown College, serving as co-captain of the 1960 team. He also won the [[River States ConferenceKentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (KIAC) championship in the shot put while competing for the track team. [1]

Coaching career

Dowling began his collegiate coaching career as an assistant at his alma mater, Georgetown College. After four seasons as Georgetown's head football coach, he became the third head football coach at Liberty Baptist College—now known as Liberty University. He led the Liberty Flames in their transition from National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) to NCAA Division II competition in 1981. [2]

After Liberty, he moved on to start the football program at Cumberland College—now known as the University of the CumberlandsWilliamsburg, Kentucky. [3]

Later life

Dowling later served as commissioner of the Mid-South Conference (MSC) from 1995 to 2002. [4] He died of pancreatic cancer, on January 7, 2018. [5]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs NAIA#
Georgetown Tigers (NAIA)(1973–1976)
1973Georgetown3–6
1974Georgetown7–216
1975Georgetown6–417
1976Georgetown7–2–111
Georgetown:23–14–1
Liberty Baptist Flames (NAIA Division I independent)(1977–1983)
1977 Liberty Baptist3–7
1978 Liberty Baptist4–5–1
1979 Liberty Baptist9–1–118
1980 Liberty Baptist7–3
1981 Liberty Baptist1–9
1982 Liberty Baptist7–419
1983 Liberty Baptist2–9
Liberty Baptist:33–38–2
Cumberland Indians (NAIA Division II independent)(1985–1986)
1985 Cumberland1–9
1986 Cumberland3–7
Cumberland Indians (Mid-South Conference)(1985–1987)
1987 Cumberland7–3T–1st18
1988 Cumberland10–15–01stL NAIA Division II First Round 7
1989 Cumberland7–35–12nd
1990 Cumberland7–2–14–12nd
1991 Cumberland4–53–3T–3rd
1992 Cumberland3–71–45th
1993 Cumberland2–92–3T–3rd
1994 Cumberland5–51–4T–5th
1995 Cumberland6–45–34th
Cumberland:55–55–1
Total:111–107–4
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lone Star Conference</span> American collegiate athletic conference

The Lone Star Conference (LSC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level. Member institutions are located in the southwestern United States, with schools in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Arkansas, with two members in the Pacific Northwest states of Oregon and Washington competing as affiliates for football only.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association</span> Athletic conference in the American Midwest

The Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level, headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri. Its fourteen member institutions, located in Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Oklahoma, include twelve public and two private schools. The MIAA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization incorporated in Missouri.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">University of the Cumberlands</span> Christian university in Kentucky, U.S.

The University of the Cumberlands is a private Christian university in Williamsburg, Kentucky. About 18,000 students are enrolled at the university.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference</span> NAIA conference

The Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference (KCAC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). The KCAC is the oldest conference in the NAIA and the second oldest in the United States, tracing its history to 1890.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mid-South Conference</span> College athletic conference in the United States

The Mid-South Conference (MSC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). Member institutions are located in Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee. The league is headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, and the commissioner is Eric Ward.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Georgetown College</span> Christian liberal arts college in Kentucky, United States

Georgetown College is a private Christian college in Georgetown, Kentucky. Chartered in 1829, Georgetown was the first Baptist college west of the Appalachian Mountains.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cumberland University</span> University in Tennessee, United States

Cumberland University is a private university in Lebanon, Tennessee. It was founded in 1842. The campus's current historic buildings were constructed between 1892 and 1896.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">University of Pikeville</span> Private university in Pikeville, KY, US

The University of Pikeville (UPIKE) is a private university affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA) and located in Pikeville, Kentucky. It was founded in 1889 by the Presbyterian Church and is located on a 25-acre (10 ha) campus on a hillside overlooking downtown Pikeville.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">TranSouth Athletic Conference</span>

The TranSouth Athletic Conference (TSAC) was a college athletic conference for smaller colleges and universities located in the Southern United States. It was affiliated with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and competes in that organization's Region XI.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Campbellsville University</span> Private university in Kentucky

Campbellsville University (CU) is a private Christian university in Campbellsville, Kentucky. It was founded as Russell Creek Academy and enrolls more than 12,000 students. The university offers associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Appalachian Athletic Conference</span>

The Appalachian Athletic Conference (AAC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). Members of the conference are located in the Southeastern United States in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia.

The Tennessee Collegiate Athletic Conference (TCAC) was a former college athletic conference affiliated with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA); which was predominantly for smaller, private colleges in Western and Middle Tennessee.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association</span> Defunct American college athletic conference

The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) was one of the first collegiate athletic conferences in the United States. Twenty-seven of the current Division I FBS football programs were members of this conference at some point, as were at least 19 other schools. Every member of the current Southeastern Conference except Arkansas and Missouri, as well as six of the 15 current members of the Atlantic Coast Conference plus future SEC member University of Texas at Austin, currently of the Big 12 Conference, formerly held membership in the SIAA.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">River States Conference</span>

The River States Conference (RSC), formerly known as the Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (KIAC), is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). Although it was historically a Kentucky-only conference, it has now expanded to include members in Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and at various times in the past has also had members in Missouri, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Mike Ayers is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at East Tennessee State University from 1985 to 1987 and Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina from 1988 to 2017, compiling career college football coaching record of 218–160–2. Ayers' Wofford Terriers won five Southern Conference title, in 2003, 2007, 2010, 2012, and 2017.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1916 college football season</span> American college football season

The 1916 college football season had no very clear cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing Army and Pittsburgh as national champions. Only Pittsburgh claims a national championship for the 1916 season. Georgetown led the nation in scoring with 464 points.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Georgetown Tigers</span>

The Georgetown Tigers are the athletic teams that represent Georgetown College located in Georgetown, Kentucky, in intercollegiate sports as a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), primarily competing in the Mid-South Conference (MSC) since the 1995–96 academic year. The Tigers previously competed in the Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference from 1916–17 to 1994–95.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Great Midwest Athletic Conference</span>

The Great Midwest Athletic Conference (G-MAC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level. It was named the 24th NCAA Division II conference and operates in the Great Lakes and East South Central States regions of the United States. The G-MAC began conference play in the 2012–13 academic year hosting 12 championships and continued to work through the educational assessment program. The conference received approval and became an active Division II conference in 2013–14, hosting 17 championships.

The 2012 Mid-South Conference football season is made up of 13 United States college athletic programs that compete in the Mid-South Conference (MSC) under the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) for the 2012 college football season. The conference is divided into two divisions, the East Division and the West Division.

The Brass Lantern is a traveling trophy for the winners in the Cumberlands–Union football rivalry. The award is presented in American college football rivalry games contested annually between the Cumberlands Patriots football team of the University of the Cumberlands and the Union Bulldogs football team of Union College. The schools are located less than 30 miles (48 km) apart in adjacent eastern Kentucky counties, with Cumberlands in Williamsburg and Union in Barbourville. Each annual contest is referred to as the Battle for the Brass Lantern, also locally referred to by some as "THE" game of the year.

References

  1. "Pikes Alpha Lambda Alumni Association Hall of Fame" (PDF). Retrieved February 25, 2007.
  2. "Liberty Football History" (PDF). Retrieved February 25, 2007.
  3. "Liberty Coaching History" (PDF). Retrieved February 25, 2007.
  4. "Georgetown College Hall of Fame Bio". Archived from the original on April 4, 2008. Retrieved February 24, 2008.
  5. Thomas Walter Dowling