Tom Farris

Last updated
Tom Farris
No. 36
Position: Quarterback
Personal information
Born:(1920-09-16)September 16, 1920
Casper, Wyoming, U.S.
Died:November 16, 2002(2002-11-16) (aged 82)
Citrus Heights, California, U.S.
Career information
College: Wisconsin
NFL draft: 1942  / Round: 11 / Pick: 99
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TD-INT:1-2
Passing yards:108
Passer rating:28.9
Player stats at NFL.com

Thomas George Farris (September 16, 1920 November 16, 2002) was an American football quarterback who played for the Chicago Bears (1946–1947) in National Football League (NFL) the Chicago Rockets (1948) in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC).

After playing college football at the University of Wisconsin, Farris was an 11th round selection (99th overall pick) of the 1942 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers. But before training camp, he enlisted in the United States Coast Guard to serve in World War II. He played 33 regular season games over 3 seasons. In 1946, which was his best season, he had 1 passing touchdown, 2 pass interceptions, 1 reception and 16 receiving yards.


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