Tom Feeney (footballer)

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Tom Feeney
Personal information
Full name Thomas Wilfred Feeney [1]
Date of birth(1910-08-26)26 August 1910 [1]
Place of birth Grangetown, North Yorkshire, [1] England
Date of death 5 March 1973(1973-03-05) (aged 62) [1]
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m) [2]
Position(s) Centre forward / inside forward
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
192?–1928 Grangetown St Mary's
1928–1931 Whitby United
1931–1932 Newcastle United 4 (1)
1932–1933 Notts County 17 (2)
1933–1934 Lincoln City 10 (0)
1934 Stockport County 2 (0)
1934–1937 Halifax Town 52 (11)
1937–1938 Chester 5 (0)
1938–1939 Darlington 40 (22)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

Thomas Wilfred Feeney (26 August 1910 – 5 March 1973), generally known as Tom Feeney but also as Wilf Feeney, [3] was an English footballer who scored 36 goals from 130 appearances in the Football League playing as a centre forward or inside forward for Newcastle United, Notts County, Lincoln City, Stockport County, Halifax Town, Chester and Darlington in the 1930s. [4] He began his career in non-league football with Grangetown St Mary's and Whitby United. [5]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Tom Feeney". Lincoln City FC Archive. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  2. "Darlington prospect brighter". Sunday Sun. Newcastle upon Tyne. 21 August 1938. p. 19 via Newspapers.com.
  3. "Player details: Wilfred Feeney". Toon1892. Kenneth H Scott. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  4. Joyce, Michael (2004). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939. Nottingham: SoccerData. p. 87. ISBN   978-1-899468-67-6.
  5. "Past local players of note". A B C of Football Tradition in South Bank. This is The North-East/CommuniGate. Archived from the original on 12 June 2011.