Tom Fennell

Last updated
Tom Fennell
Tom Fennell.jpg
Fennell pictured in La Vie 1908, Penn State yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1875-05-25)May 25, 1875
Jersey City, New Jersey
DiedNovember 4, 1936(1936-11-04) (aged 61)
New York, New York
Playing career
1894–1896 Cornell
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1897 Cincinnati
1904–1908 Penn State
Head coaching record
Overall42–18–2

Thomas Francis Fennell (May 25, 1875 – November 4, 1936) [1] was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Cincinnati in 1897 and at Pennsylvania State University from 1904 to 1908, compiling a career college football record of 42–18–2. Fennell played football at Cornell University, where he is a member of their Athletic Hall of Fame.

Contents

Fennell was the son of Thomas McCarthy Fennell. He graduated from Cornell Law School, and was admitted to the bar. During his legal career, he was City Attorney of Elmira, County Attorney of Chemung County, and First Deputy Secretary of State of New York. In November 1910, he ran on the Republican ticket for New York State Treasurer but was defeated.

Hall of Fame

1895 Cornell varsity crew (Henley) on the Thames River; Fennell is fifth from the left 1895 Cornell varsity crew (Henley) on the Thames River.jpg
1895 Cornell varsity crew (Henley) on the Thames River; Fennell is fifth from the left

Fennell was inducted into Cornell Athletic Hall of Fame. Fennell was described as a "star" in three different sports while at Cornell: Football, Men's Crew, and Men's Track as well as being Heavyweight Champion in boxing. The Cornell Hall of Fame states that Fennell rowed on the 1895 crew that participated in England's Henley Regatta. During their second round race against Trinity Hall, Fennell fainted in the latter stages of the race and required medical attention. [2] He was the center on the 1895 football team quarterbacked by Cornell's first All-American, Clint Wyckoff. Fennell was Penn State's first full-time head football coach and served in that capacity from 1904-08, compiling a five-year record of 33-17-1, with his [19]06 team going 8-1-1. He gave up coaching to devote time to his law practice in Elmira, N.Y., and later served as a judge of the New York State Court of Claims, and as first deputy Attorney-General of New York. [3]

Fennell's nephew, Thomas Francis Fennell II, Class of 1926, is also a Cornell Athletic Hall of Famer.

Thomas Fennell Penn State Football Coach Thomas Fennell Penn State Football Coach.jpg
Thomas Fennell Penn State Football Coach

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Cincinnati (Independent)(1897)
1897 Cincinnati 9–1–1
Cincinnati:9–1–1
Penn State / Penn State Nittany Lions (Independent)(1904–1908)
1904 Penn State 6–4
1905 Penn State 8–3
1906 Penn State 8–1–1
1907 Penn State 6–4
1908 Penn State 5–5
Cincinnati:33–17–1
Total:42–18–2

Related Research Articles

Fielding H. Yost

Fielding Harris Yost was an American football player, coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at: Ohio Wesleyan University, the University of Nebraska, the University of Kansas, Stanford University, San Jose State University, and the University of Michigan, compiling a college football career record of 198–35–12. During his 25 seasons as the head football coach at Ann Arbor, Yost's Michigan Wolverines won six national championships, captured ten Big Ten Conference titles, and amassed a record of 165–29–10.

Sam Francis (American football)

Harrison Samuel Francis was an American football player and coach, Olympic shot putter, and Army officer.

Hugo Bezdek Czech-American athlete and coach

Hugo Francis Bezdek was a Czech American athlete who played American football and was a coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He was the head football coach at the University of Oregon, the University of Arkansas (1908–1912), Pennsylvania State University (1918–1929), and Delaware Valley College (1949). Bezdek also coached the Mare Island Marines in the 1918 Rose Bowl and the Cleveland Rams of the National Football League (NFL) in 1937 and part of the 1938 season. In addition, Bezdek coached basketball at Oregon and Penn State (1919), coached baseball at Arkansas (1909–1913), Oregon (1914–1917) and Penn State (1920–1930), and served as the manager of Major League Baseball's Pittsburgh Pirates (1917–1919). He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1954.

Thomas McCarthy Fennell

Thomas McCarthy Fennell was a Fenian political prisoner transported as a convict to Western Australia.

Frank Shaughnessy American athlete and sports executive

Francis Joseph "Shag" Shaughnessy was an American athlete and sports executive. Shaughnessy played both baseball and football and was an executive in baseball, football and ice hockey. He was born in the United States and moved to Canada in the 1910s, where he was involved with football and ice hockey teams in Montreal and Ottawa. He was later president of the International League of baseball. His son Frank Shaughnessy, Jr. also played football and ice hockey, and played ice hockey for the United States in the 1936 Winter Olympics.

Gomer Jones

Gomer Thomas Jones was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He played college football as a center at Ohio State University from 1933 to 1935. After serving as an assistant coach for 17 years under Bud Wilkinson at the University of Oklahoma, Jones helmed the Sooners for two seasons in 1964 and 1965, compiling a record of 9–11–1. He was also the athletic director at Oklahoma from 1964 until his death in 1971. Jones was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1978.

Edwin Sweetland

Edwin Regur Sweetland was a coach, trainer, and athletic administrator at several American universities. During his coaching career he was head coach of many sports including basketball, track and field and crew, but the majority of for his coaching work was in football. Though mainly known for football, he left his mark on several college athletics departments and other sports. This includes being the first athletic trainer at Ohio State University, the first paid coach of the Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball team, and the first coach of Syracuse University rowing team.

M. B. Banks American college coachand athletics administrator

Mark Beal Banks was an American football, basketball and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Centre College (1909–1911), Ohio Wesleyan University (1912), Ohio University (1913–1917), Drake University (1918–1920), the University of Tennessee (1921–1925), and Hartwick College (1941–1948), compiling a career college football record of 100–73–10. Banks was also the head basketball and head baseball coach at Ohio Wesleyan, Ohio, Drake, and Tennessee. He played football, basketball, and baseball at Syracuse University.

John "Clipper" Smith

John Philip "Little Clipper" Smith was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He played college football as a guard at the University of Notre Dame under Knute Rockne. Smith was a consensus All-American in 1927. He later served as the head coach at North Carolina State University from 1931 to 1933 and at Duquesne University from 1936 to 1938, compiling a career record of 28–24–5. Smith was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1975. He died on May 11, 1973 in West Hartford, Connecticut just before a National Football Foundation awards dinner that was to have honored him.

Carl Snavely

Carl Gray "The Grey Fox" Snavely was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Bucknell University (1927–1933), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cornell University (1936–1944), and Washington University in St. Louis (1953–1958), compiling a career college football record of 180–96–16. Snavely was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1965.

George Washington Woodruff American judge

George Washington Woodruff was an American football player, rower, coach, teacher, lawyer and politician. He served as the head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania (1892–1901), the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (1903), and Carlisle Indian Industrial School (1905), compiling a career college football record of 142–25–2. Woodruff's Penn teams of 1894, 1895, and 1897 have been recognized as national champions. Woodruff was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1963.

Edward Lowell Rogers was an American football player and coach. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1968. Rogers was also elected to the American Indian Athletic Hall of Fame in 1973.

Sphinx Head

The Sphinx Head Society is the oldest senior honor society at Cornell University. Sphinx Head recognizes Cornell senior men and women who have demonstrated respectable strength of character on top of a dedication to leadership and service at Cornell University. In 1929 The New York Times held that election into Sphinx Head and similar societies constituted "the highest non-scholastic honor within reach of undergraduates."

Thomas Francis Fennell II was an American football player and boxer at Cornell University. He was inducted into the Cornell Athletic Hall of Fame in 1989.

Charles E. Courtney rower and rowing coach

Charles Edward Courtney was an American rower and rowing coach from Union Springs, New York. A carpenter by trade, Courtney was a nationally known amateur rower. Courtney never lost a race as an amateur and finished a total of 88 victories.

William S. "Dusty" Newman was an American football player and coach. He was a first-team All-American center for Cornell University in 1906. He later coached football at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School as an assistant to Pop Warner in 1907 and at Georgetown University as the school's head coach from 1908 to 1909.

Ray Van Orman was an American veterinarian and college football and lacrosse coach. He served as the head lacrosse and football coach at Johns Hopkins University, from 1920 to 1935 and 1926 to 1935 respectively, and the head lacrosse coach at Cornell University from 1940 to 1949. Van Orman was inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1992.

Ronald J. Torgalski is a former American college baseball coach. He was most recently the head baseball coach for the University at Buffalo. During his nine seasons as coach of the Bulls, he has compiled an overall record of 182–296.

Thomas Jefferson Smull was an American professor of engineering, athletics administrator, athlete, and coach. He was the head football coach at Ohio Northern University in 1905, 1910 and 1918. A member of the faculty at Ohio Northern from 1905 to 1942, he was also the faculty manager of athletics and was known as the school's "father of athletics".

References

  1. "Thomas Francis Fennell; Ex-Judge of State Court of Claims a Former Cornell Athlete". The New York Times . November 4, 1936. Retrieved July 16, 2009.
  2. Langstedt, Eric (October 2012). The Rise of Cornell Rowing 1871-1920. St. Magnus Press. p. 124. ISBN   978-0-578-11231-2.
  3. "Thomas F. Fennell - Class of 1896 - Hall of Fame - Cornell University". Cornell University . Retrieved April 1, 2019.