Tom Gillespie

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Tom Gillespie
Personal information
Full name Thomas Bennett Gillespie
Date of birth 28 February 1901 [1]
Place of birth Girvan, Scotland
Date of death 1975 (aged 7374)
Place of death Glasgow, Scotland
Position(s) Forward
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1922–1925 Queen of the South 45 (10)
1923–1924Hamilton Academical (loan) 20 (1)
1925–1926 Preston North End 23 (3)
1926–1930 Bethlehem Steel 137 (83)
1930–1931 Newark Skeeters 31 (7)
1931–1932 Preston North End 4 (0)
1933 Montrose   12 (5)
1933 St Mirren   1 (0)
1934–1935 Montrose   14 (5)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

Thomas Bennett Gillespie (28 February 1901 – 1975) was a Scottish footballer who played professionally as a forward in Scotland, England and the United States.

Contents

Career

Gillespie began his career with Dumfries club Queen of the South in his native Scotland. He spent time with Hamilton Academical before moving south to Preston North End in 1925. [1]

In the summer of 1926, Gillespie left Britain to join Bethlehem Steel of the American Soccer League. He became a surprising goal scoring threat. During his first season in the ASL, he scored thirty-three league goals and four cup goals in thirty-two league and four cup games. [2] His goal scoring prowess decreased in his second season as he gained only twenty-eight goals in forty-three league games, plus another three goals in nine cup games. But that still put him third on the league goals table. [3] During the 1928–1929 season, the league expelled Bethlehem Steel during the 'Soccer War'. Before their expulsion, Gillespie had scored two goals in six league games. Bethlehem Steel then joined the Eastern Soccer League where Gillespie thirteen goals in the first half of the season. [4] However, he scored only four goals in the second half of the season. From this point on, he was no longer a goal scoring threat. When Bethlehem Steel returned to the ASL, Gillespie's goal production dipped to four in twenty-three games. In 1930, Bethlehem Steel Company withdrew their team from the league and disbanded it after suffering significant financial losses. Gillespie moved to the Newark Skeeters for one season before returning to Preston North End where he played four games during the 1931–1932 season. After moving back to Scotland with Montrose in 1933, good form prompted St Mirren to sign him; however, that contract was cancelled within a few months and he reverted to Montrose for another year before retiring. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 John Litster (October 2012). "A Record of pre-war Scottish League Players". Scottish Football Historian magazine.{{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. The Year in American Soccer – 1927
  3. The Year in American Soccer – 1928
  4. The Year in American Soccer – 1929