Tom Gorman (umpire)

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Larry Albert Napp, born Larry Albert Napodano, was an American umpire in Major League Baseball who worked in the American League from 1951 to 1974. He officiated in the World Series in 1954, 1956, 1963 and 1969, and in the All-Star Game in 1953, 1957, 1961 and 1968, calling balls and strikes in 1961. He also worked the American League Championship Series in 1971 and 1974, serving as crew chief in 1974. His 3,609 total games ranked sixth in AL history when he retired.

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References

  1. Berkow, Ira. "Sports of the Times; Tom Gorman's Final Call", The New York Times , August 17, 1986. Accessed July 9, 2016. "Yesterday, in a cemetery in Paramus, N.J., Thomas David Gorman, born in Hell's Kitchen in Manhattan, was laid to rest. 'When I go,' he had told his children, 'I want to be buried in my umpiring suit, and holding my indicator.'"
  2. "1952 Power Memorial Academy Yearbook". www.classmates.com. Retrieved November 16, 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 Willson, Brad (March 15, 1975). "Gorman, Umpire of the Year, Starting 25th Season in N.L.". The Sporting News. p. 39.
  4. 1 2 "Obituaries". The Sporting News . August 25, 1986. p. 41.
  5. Coberly, Rich (1985). The No-Hit Hall of Fame: No-Hitters of the 20th Century. Newport Beach, California: Triple Play. p.  173. ISBN   0-934289-00-X.
  6. Coberly, p. 115.
  7. Coberly, p. 144.
  8. Coberly, p. 107.
  9. Dittmar, Joseph J. (1990). Baseball's Benchmark Boxscores. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co. pp. 95–97. ISBN   0-89950-488-4.
  10. Dittmar, pp. 97-99.
  11. Dittmar, pp. 109-112.
  12. Dittmar, pp. 114-116.
  13. "Space Magazines." MAD Super Special Summer 1983. p. 73.
  14. via Associated Press. "Former major league ump, Tom Gorman, Dies", Williamson Daily News , August 13, 1986. Accessed March 2, 2011. "CLOSTER, N.J. – Tom Gorman, a major league umpire for 25 years until his retirement in 1976, is dead of a heart attack. Gorman died Tuesday at the age of 67 at his home in this Northern New Jersey town."
  15. ISBN   0-684-16169-9.
Tom Gorman
Tom Gorman 1955.jpg
Pitcher/Umpire
Born:(1919-03-16)March 16, 1919
New York City
Died: August 11, 1986(1986-08-11) (aged 67)
Closter, New Jersey
Batted: Right
Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 14, 1939, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
September 18, 1939, for the New York Giants