Tom Graveney

Last updated

  1. 1 2 Brenkley, Stephen (3 November 2015). "Tom Graveney dead: Farewell to an exquisite batsman and man of true principle". The Independent. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 "Tom Graveney, cricketer – obituary". The Daily Telegraph. 3 November 2015. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 "Tom Graveney". The Times. 4 November 2015. p. 60.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Berry, Scyld (3 November 2015). "Tom Graveney: The majestic batsman who stood out even in game's golden age". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Tom Graveney: 'I cannot understand now why I wasn't killed'". The Independent. 1 September 2008. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  6. Dobell, George (3 November 2015). "Tom Graveney dies at the age of 88". ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  7. "Tom Graveney: Former England cricketer dies, aged 88". BBC Sport. 4 November 2015. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
  8. "Ex-England aces dominate ICC list". BBC Sport. 2 January 2009. Retrieved 4 November 2015.
Tom Graveney

OBE
Tom Graveney 1954.jpg
Tom Graveney in 1954
Personal information
Full name
Thomas William Graveney
Born(1927-06-16)16 June 1927
Riding Mill, Hexham, Northumberland, England
Died3 November 2015(2015-11-03) (aged 88)
NicknameLong Tom
BattingRight-handed
BowlingRight-arm leg break
RoleBatsman
Relations
International information
National side
Test debut(cap  358)5 July 1951 v  South Africa
Last Test12 June 1969 v  West Indies
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
Sporting positions
Preceded by Gloucester County Cricket Club captain
1959–60
Succeeded by
Preceded by Worcestershire County Cricket Club captain
1968–70
Succeeded by

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