Tom Hart (baseball)

Last updated
Tom Hart
Catcher/Outfielder
Born:(1869-06-15)June 15, 1869
Canaan, New York
Died: September 17, 1939(1939-09-17) (aged 70)
Gardner, Massachusetts
Batted: Unknown
Threw: Unknown
MLB debut
April 15, 1891, for the  Washington Statesmen
Last MLB appearance
May 7, 1891, for the  Washington Statesmen
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This biographical article relating to a United States baseball catcher born in the 1860s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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