Tom Heintzelman

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Tom Heintzelman
Infielder
Born: (1946-11-03) November 3, 1946 (age 77)
St. Charles, Missouri
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 12, 1973, for the  St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1978, for the  San Francisco Giants
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