Tom Herbert

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Tom Herbert
Tom Herbert in Too Many Women.jpg
Herbert in Too Many Women (1942)
Born(1888-11-25)November 25, 1888
DiedApril 3, 1946(1946-04-03) (aged 57)
OccupationActor
Years active19311946

Tom Herbert (November 25, 1888 April 3, 1946) was an American character actor of the 1930s and 1940s.

Contents

Biography

Born in New York City on November 25, 1888, Herbert broke into the film industry in RKO's Traveling Husbands (1931). [1] During the next seventeen years he would appear in over 50 feature films, usually in bit or supporting roles. Early in his career he was sometimes billed as Tom Francis, as he was in Traveling Husbands. [2] His final picture, which was released after his death in 1946, was the Cole Porter biopic, Night and Day , starring Cary Grant and Alexis Smith. [3] He was the brother to the actor, Hugh Herbert. Tom Herbert died on April 3, 1946.[ citation needed ]

Filmography

(Per AFI database) [2]

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References

  1. "Traveling Husbands: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Tom Herbert". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 11, 2015.
  3. "Night and Day: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. Retrieved March 29, 2015.