Tom Jenkins (wrestler)

Last updated
Tom Jenkins
Tom Jenkins 2.jpg
BornAugust 3, 1872 [1]
Bedford, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, U.S.
DiedJune 19, 1957 [1] (aged 84)
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s) Tom Jenkins
Billed height5 ft 10.5 in (179 cm) [1]
Billed from Bedford, Ohio [1]
Trained byLuke Lamb [1]
Debut1890s
Retiredsemi-retired 1905, retired 1914

Tom Jenkins (August 3, 1872 – June 19, 1957) was an American professional wrestler who held the American Heavyweight Championship three times around the turn of the 20th century. On May 4, 1905 at Madison Square Garden, he wrestled for the newly created World Catch-as-Catch-Can Championship, but lost to George Hackenschmidt. He later taught at the United States Military Academy at West Point (1905–1942) and from 1912 to 1943, he also taught wrestling and boxing at the New York Military Academy at Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York.

Contents

Championships and accomplishments

Professional wrestling

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Wrestler Profiles: Tom Jenkins". Online World of Wrestling. Retrieved 2008-05-06.
  2. Johnson, Mike (March 13, 2022). "Steve Austin & More: nternational Professional Wrestling Hall of Fame Class of 2022 Announced". PWInsider.com. Archived from the original on February 2, 2023. Retrieved May 13, 2022.