Tom Jordan (baseball)

Last updated
Tom Jordan
Catcher
Born: (1919-09-05) September 5, 1919 (age 99)
Lawton, Oklahoma
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 4, 1944, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
April 28, 1948, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average .240
Home runs 1
Runs batted in 6
Teams

Thomas Jefferson Jordan (born September 5, 1919) is a retired American professional baseball player, a catcher who appeared in 39 Major League games over three seasons for the Chicago White Sox (1944; 1946), Cleveland Indians (1946), and the St. Louis Browns (1948). Born in Lawton, Oklahoma, Jordan stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 195 pounds (88 kg). He threw and batted right-handed.

Professional baseball is played in leagues throughout the world. In these leagues and associated farm teams, baseball players are selected for their talents and are paid to play for a specific team or club system.

Catcher defensive position in baseball and softball played behind home plate, facing the field

Catcher is a position for a baseball or softball player. When a batter takes his/her turn to hit, the catcher crouches behind home plate, in front of the (home) umpire, and receives the ball from the pitcher. In addition to this primary duty, the catcher is also called upon to master many other skills in order to field the position well. The role of the catcher is similar to that of the wicket-keeper in cricket.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Contents

Biography

Jordan's professional career took place over a twenty-year period, beginning in the minor leagues in 1938 and ending in 1957 after he was a playing manager for a number of unaffiliated teams in the low minors in the Southwestern United States. He spent the entire 1946 campaign in Major League Baseball, starting with the White Sox before being traded to Cleveland for fellow catcher Frankie Hayes on July 5. As a member of the Indians, on August 25, he hit his only MLB home run, a solo shot at Fenway Park off 20-game-winner Boo Ferriss in a 2–1 Boston Red Sox win. [1]

Manager (baseball) someone who manages a baseball team

In baseball, the field manager is the equivalent of a head coach who is responsible for overseeing and making final decisions on all aspects of on-field team strategy, lineup selection, training and instruction. Managers are typically assisted by a staff of assistant coaches whose responsibilities are specialized. Field managers are typically not involved in off-field personnel decisions or long-term club planning, responsibilities that are instead held by a team's general manager.

Southwestern United States Geographical region of the USA

The Southwestern United States, also known as the American Southwest, is the informal name for a region of the western United States. Definitions of the region's boundaries vary a great deal and have never been standardized, though many boundaries have been proposed. For example, one definition includes the stretch from the Mojave Desert in California to Carlsbad, New Mexico, and from the Mexico–United States border to the southern areas of Colorado, Utah, and Nevada. The largest metropolitan areas are centered around Phoenix, Las Vegas, Tucson, Albuquerque, and El Paso. Those five metropolitan areas have an estimated total population of more than 9.6 million as of 2017, with nearly 60 percent of them living in the two Arizona cities—Phoenix and Tucson.

Frankie Hayes baseball player

Franklin Witman "Blimp" Hayes was an American professional baseball catcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics, St. Louis Browns, Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, and Boston Red Sox. Although Hayes was considered one of the best catchers in the American League in the late 1930s and early 1940s, he played for an Athletics team that routinely finished in last place. A six-time All-Star, he holds the major league record of most consecutive games played by a catcher.

During his big-league career, Jordan collected 23 hits in 96 at bats, including four doubles and two triples. A son, Tom Jr., was winning pitcher of the championship game of the 1956 Little League World Series. [2]

Hit (baseball) in baseball, hitting the ball into fair territory and safely reaching base without the benefit of an error or fielders choice

In baseball statistics, a hit, also called a base hit, is credited to a batter when the batter safely reaches first base after hitting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielder's choice.

In baseball, a double is the act of a batter striking the pitched ball and safely reaching second base without being called out by the umpire, without the benefit of a fielder's misplay or another runner being put out on a fielder's choice. A double is a type of hit and is sometimes called a "two-bagger" or "two-base hit". For statistical and scorekeeping purposes it is denoted by 2B.

Triple (baseball) in baseball, a three-base hit

In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base after hitting the ball, with neither the benefit of a fielder's misplay nor another runner being put out on a fielder's choice. A triple is sometimes called a "three-bagger" or "three-base hit". For statistical and scorekeeping purposes it is denoted by 3B.

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References

  1. 1946-8-25 box score from Retrosheet
  2. Hoenig, Dick (August 25, 1956). "Roswell Defeats Delaware Twp. In Little League Final". Standard-Sentinel. Hazleton, Pennsylvania. AP. p. 20. Retrieved August 25, 2018 via newspapers.com.

Further reading