Tom Kane (baseball)

Last updated
Tom Kane
Second baseman
Born:(1906-12-15)December 15, 1906
Chicago
Died: November 26, 1973(1973-11-26) (aged 66)
Chicago
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
August 3, 1938, for the  Boston Bees
Last MLB appearance
August 13, 1938, for the  Boston Bees
MLB statistics
Batting average .000
Home runs 0
Runs batted in 0
Teams

Thomas Joseph Kane (December 15, 1906 – November 26, 1973), nicknamed "Sugar", was a professional baseball player. He was a second baseman for one season (1938) with the Boston Bees. For his career, he collected no hits in two at-bats with two walks in two games.

He was born and later died in Chicago at the age of 66.


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