Tom Keating (American football)

Last updated
Tom Keating
No. 74
Position: Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born:(1942-09-02)September 2, 1942
Chicago, Illinois
Died:August 31, 2012(2012-08-31) (aged 69)
Denver, Colorado
Career information
College: Michigan
NFL Draft: 1964  / Round: 4 / Pick: 53
AFL draft: 1964  / Round: 5 / Pick: 34
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:114
Games started:25
Fumble recoveries:5

Thomas Arthur Keating (September 2, 1942 – August 31, 2012) was an American football player who played at the defensive tackle position. He played college football for the University of Michigan from 1961 to 1963. He also played 12 seasons of professional football in the American and National Football Leagues from 1964 to 1975. He was an AFL All-Star in 1966 and 1967, a key to the 1967 Oakland Raiders' defensive line that led the team to a 13-1 record and the 1967 AFL Championship, and was considered "the premier tackle in the old American Football League". [1] He was known for his use of a distinctive four-point stance in which he lined up with both hands on the ground. [2]

Contents

Early years

Keating was born in Chicago in 1942. He attended St. Mel High School in Chicago. [3]

University of Michigan

Keating enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1960 and played college football at the tackle position on head coach Bump Elliott's Michigan Wolverines football teams from 1961 to 1963. [4] As a junior, he started eight of nine games at left tackle for the 1962 Michigan Wolverines football team that compiled a 2-7 record and finished in last place in the Big Ten Conference. [5] As a senior, he started all nine games at left tackle and was selected as the Most Valuable Player on the 1963 Michigan Wolverines football team that compiled a 3-4-2 record and finished in fifth place in the Big Ten Conference. [6]

Professional football

Buffalo Bills

Keating was selected by the Buffalo Bills in the fifth round (34th overall pick) of the 1964 American Football League Draft. [3] He spent the 1964 and 1965 AFL seasons as a backup player for the Bills, appearing in three games in 1964 and six games in 1965. [3]

Oakland Raiders

Keating joined the Oakland Raiders for the 1966 AFL season. He earned AFL All-Star honors with the Raider in 1966 and 1967. He was the starting right tackle for the Raiders' 1967 AFL Championship victory over the Houston Oilers as well as their Super Bowl II loss to the Green Bay Packers. Keating anchored a defensive line for the 1967 Raiders team that finished with the fewest yards rushing and the fewest rushing yards per attempt in the AFL, as well as third in fewest passing yards and second fewest points allowed. [7] The front four of Keating, Dan Birdwell, Ike Lassiter, and Ben Davidson contributed to the team's total of 67 sacks and 666 yards lost against the opposing offense. [8] He played for the Raiders through 1972. He was considered "the premier tackle in the old American Football League" until he was slowed by a series of leg injuries. [1]

Pittsburgh Steelers

In July 1973, the Raiders traded Keating to the Pittsburgh Steelers for an undisclosed 1974 draft pick. [9] Keating appeared in 12 games, four as a starter, for the Steelers during the 1973 NFL season. [3]

Kansas City Chiefs

In September 1974, Keating signed with the Kansas City Chiefs. [10] He became a starter for the Chiefs during the 1974 NFL season, appearing in 14 games, including 12 as the team's starting left tackle. [3] He concluded his football career with the Chiefs in 1975, appearing in nine games, four as a starter. [3]

Later years and family

After retiring from football, Keating worked as a private investigator for a law firm and later opened his own agency in Walnut Creek, California. [2] He maintained his primary residence in the Bay Area, but began spending several months a year in Limoux in the south of France. [2]

Keating had three sons, James Alexander Keating, Patrick Gould and Ryan Gould. [2] Keating's younger brother, Bill Keating, also played football for the University of Michigan and in the American Football League. [11]

Keating died from prostate cancer in 2012 at a hospice in Denver, Colorado. [2] Postmortem, Keating was diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy. [12]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Time To Pass Judgment On Trade Made By Steelers For Tom Keating". Sarasota Journal (UPI story). July 23, 1973. p. 4C.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Vic Tafur (September 4, 2012). "Ex-Raiders lineman Tom Keating dies". San Francisco Chronicle .
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Tom Keating". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  4. "Michigan Football Roster Database". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 23, 2015.
  5. "1962 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  6. "1963 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  7. "1967 Oakland Raiders Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  8. Tex Maule, Edwin Shrake (1968-09-16). "The Raiders are again the class of the West, but the – 09.16.68 – SI Vault". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  9. "Steelers Trade for Tom Keating". St. Petersburg Times. July 23, 1973.
  10. "Keating Finds a Job -- With Kansas City". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 6, 1974. p. 9.
  11. "Tom Keating". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  12. "110 N.F.L. Brains". New York Times. July 25, 2017. Retrieved 25 July 2017.