Tom Keegan (politician)

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Keegan in 1922 Thomas Michael Keegan.png
Keegan in 1922

Thomas Michael Keegan (29 May 1878 14 September 1937) was an Australian politician.

Born in Ararat, Victoria to miner John Walter Keegan and Mary Flood, he attended primary schools before becoming a miner at Wyalong. Active in the miners' union and the Labor Party, he moved to Sydney around 1901. Around 1902 he married Marie Hallan, with whom he had three children; he would remarry Doris Martin around 1927. In 1910 he was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the Labor member for the Glebe. [1] [2]

Keegan was elected president of the Glebe Rugby League Club, a position he would remain in until 1920. [3]

Keegan was defeated in the election of 1920 after the introduction of proportional representation but returned to the Assembly on 18 October 1921 as the only unsuccessful Labor candidate at the 1920 election for Balmain, filling the casual vacancy caused by the death of the Premier John Storey. [4] When proportional representation was abandoned in 1927 he returned to his old seat of Glebe, serving until 1935. From May to October 1927 he served as Minister for Local Government. Keegan died in 1937 in Sydney. [5]

His brother John was a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council from 1925 to 1934. [6]

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References

  1. Green, Antony. "1910 The Glebe". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  2. "Keegan, Thomas Michael (1878–1937)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 14 January 2017 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  3. Hogan, Michael (2004). Local Labor: A History of the Labor Party in Glebe, 1891-2003. Australia: Federation Press. p. 62. ISBN   9781862874930 . Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  4. Green, Antony. "1921 Balmain appointment". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  5. "Mr Thomas Michael Keegan (1878-1937)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 30 April 2019.
  6. "Mr John Keegan (1875-1941)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 29 June 2020.

 

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
James Hogue
Member for Glebe
1910–1920
District abolished
Preceded by
John Storey
Member for Balmain
1921–1927
With: Doyle/Stopford/Evatt
Quirk
Smith/Lane
Stuart-Robertson
Succeeded by
H. V. Evatt
New district Member for Glebe
1927–1935
Succeeded by
Bill Carlton