Tom Leahy (baseball)

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Tom Leahy
Tom Leahy 1904.jpeg
Catcher
Born:(1869-06-02)June 2, 1869
New Haven, Connecticut
Died: June 11, 1951(1951-06-11) (aged 82)
New Haven, Connecticut
Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 18,  1897, for the  Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
October 7,  1905, for the  St. Louis Cardinals
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