Tom Moran (blocking back)

Last updated
Tom Moran
Position: Blocking back
Personal information
Born:(1899-12-10)December 10, 1899
Nashville, Tennessee
Died:July 4, 1933(1933-07-04) (aged 33)
Horse Cave, Kentucky
Height:5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight:175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High school:Horse Cave (KY)
College: Centre
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Tom McGee Moran (December 10, 1899 – July 4, 1933) was an American football blocking back who played one season with the New York Giants of the National Football League. He played college football at Centre College and attended Horse Cave High School in Horse Cave, Kentucky. [1] His father, Charley Moran, was a Major League Baseball player and college football coach. [2]

Prior to his playing career in the NFL, he was a coach at Carson–Newman University in Jefferson City, Tennessee, and he also served as short time as the interim coach of the Frankford Yellow Jackets while his father, Charley Moran, officiated the 1927 World Series. [3]

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References

  1. "TOM MORAN". profootballarchives.com. Archived from the original on April 17, 2015. Retrieved April 16, 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. Siler, Tom (June 22, 1949). "Death Ends Colorful Career of Charley Moran". The Sporting News . p. 15.
  3. Maxymuk, John (July 30, 2012). NFL Head Coaches: A Biographical Dictionary, 1920–2011. McFarland. ISBN   9780786492954 . Retrieved January 17, 2018.