Tom Ryder (baseball)

Last updated
Tom Ryder
Outfielder
Born:(1863-05-09)May 9, 1863
Dubuque, Iowa
Died: July 18, 1935(1935-07-18) (aged 72)
Dubuque, Iowa
Batted: LeftThrew: Unknown
MLB debut
July 22, 1884, for the  St. Louis Maroons
Last MLB appearance
August 6, 1884, for the  St. Louis Maroons
MLB statistics
Batting average .250
Home runs 0
Runs scored 4
Teams

Thomas Ryder (May 9, 1863 – July 18, 1935) was a 19th-century professional baseball outfielder. He played for the St. Louis Maroons of the Union Association in July and August 1884.

Baseball team sport

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objective of the offensive team is to hit the ball into the field of play, allowing it to run the bases—having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

Outfielder defensive position in baseball

An outfielder is a person playing in one of the three defensive positions in baseball or softball, farthest from the batter. These defenders are the left fielder, the center fielder, and the right fielder. As an outfielder, their duty is to catch fly balls and/ ground balls then to return them to the infield for the out or before the runner advances, if there is any runners on the bases. As an outfielder, they normally play behind the six players located in the field. By convention, each of the nine defensive positions in baseball is numbered. The outfield positions are 7, 8 and 9. These numbers are shorthand designations useful in baseball scorekeeping and are not necessarily the same as the squad numbers worn on player uniforms.

The Union Association was a league in Major League Baseball which lasted for only one season in 1884. St. Louis won the pennant and joined the National League the following season. Chicago moved to Pittsburgh in late August, and four teams folded during the season and were replaced. Seven of the twelve teams who were in the league at some point during the season did not play a full schedule.


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